Simple Pleasures: Soothing Suggestions and Small Comforts for Living Well Year Round

Conari Press
2
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Illustrated with charming line art, this is both a guide to and a celebration of the art of living well, with stories, quotes, recipes, craft ideas, all arranged by season. From relaxation techniques to how to make candied flowers, this is a compendium of ideas to bring moments of pleasure to everyday life.
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About the author

Susannah Seton is the author of Simple Pleasures of the Home, Simple Pleasures of the Garden, Simple Pleasures for the Holidays, and co-author of Simple Pleasures: Soothing Suggestions and Small Comforts for Living Well Year-Round. She lives in Berkeley, California, with her husband and daughter.

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3.5
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Additional Information

Publisher
Conari Press
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Published on
Jan 31, 2002
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Pages
240
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ISBN
9781609253516
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Language
English
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Genres
Self-Help / Personal Growth / Happiness
Self-Help / Spiritual
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Who were the first owners of the music published in England in the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries? Who went to ‘the dwelling house of ... T. East, by Paules wharfe’ and bought a copy of Byrd’s Psalmes, sonets, & songs when it appeared in 1588? Who purchased a copy of Dowland’s First booke of songes in 1597? What other books formed part of their music library? In this survey of surviving books of music published before 1640, David Greer has gleaned information about the books’ early and subsequent owners by studying the traces they left in the books themselves: handwritten inscriptions, including names and other marks of ownership - even the scribbles and drawings a child of the family might put into a book left lying about.

The result is a treasure trove of information about musical culture in early modern England. From inscriptions and marks of ownership Greer has been able to re-assemble early sets of partbooks, as well as collections of books once bound together. The search has also turned up new music. At a time when paper was expensive, new pieces were copied into blank spaces in printed books. In these jottings we find a ‘hidden repertory’ of music, some of it otherwise undiscovered music by known composers. In other cases, we see owners altering the words of songs, to suit new and personal purposes: a love-song in praise of Daphne becomes a heartfelt song to ‘my Jesus’; and ‘Faire Leonilla’ becomes Ophelia (perhaps the first mention of this character in Hamlet outside the play itself). On a more practical level, the users of the music sometimes made corrections to printing errors, and there are indications that some of these were last-minute corrections made in the printing-house (a useful guide for the modern editor). The temptation to ‘scribble in books’ was as irresistible to some Elizabethans as it is to some of us today. In doing so they left us clues to their identity, how they kept their music, how they used it, and the multifarious ways in which it played a part in their lives.

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