Annals and legends of Calais

J. R. Smith
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Publisher
J. R. Smith
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Published on
Dec 31, 1852
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Pages
220
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Language
English
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Genres
Anecdotes
Calais (France)
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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Scottish newspapers represent one of the most fruitful sources for genealogical research available, albeit an overlooked one. One important newspaper was the Aberdeen Journal, which was founded in 1747 and published continuously until 1922. For his second new book for Clearfield Company, Mr. Dobson has culled all the genealogical references to the Americas made in "Scottish" sources appearing in the Aberdeen Journal between 1748 and 1783. By "Scottish," the compiler refers only to sources within Scotland, and not data which the Journal published from English or colonial sources. The period covers the years when the Chesapeake tobacco trade was under the control of Glasgow merchants and Scottish emigration to the colonies was becoming significant. Mr. Dobson has abstracted and arranged in chronological order some 750 references from the Aberdeen newspaper, giving the issue number for each reference so that researchers may consult the original if they so desire. The subjects covered are a diverse lot, ranging over the following: emigration per se, the banishment of felons to the Plantations, shipping links that facilitated emigration, advertisements for indentured servants, news of events in the colonies, details on Scottish regiments fighting in the French and Indian Wars or Revolutionary War, reports of privateers, letters from America, and obituaries of American emigrants. All and all, this rich new source of potential connections for persons of Scottish ancestry provides fascinating insight into the social and economic links between colonial America and Scotland, particularly Aberdeen.
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