Political and Military Sociology

Political and Military Sociology

Book 1
Transaction Publishers
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Political and Military Sociology continues a mission of publishing cutting-edge research on some of the most important issues in civil-military relations. In this inaugural volume of the new annual publication, Won-Taek Kang tackles the issue of nostalgia for Park Chung Hee in South Korea, and analyzes why many South Koreans today appear to miss the deceased dictator. Ryan Kelty, Todd Woodruff, and David R. Segal focus on the role identity of U.S. combat soldiers as they balance competing demands made by the military profession, on the one hand, and solders’ family and personal relations, on the other. D. Michael Lindsay considers the impact that social contact has on military and civilian participants in the elite White House Fellowship program, and analyzes how social contact affects the confidence in the U.S. military that civilian fellows later show. Analyzing letters to the editor of a local newspaper, Chris M. Messer and Thomas E. Shriver consider how community activists attempt to frame the issue of environmental degradation in the context of a local dispute over the storage of radioactive waste. David Pion-Berlin, Antonio Uges, Jr., and Diego Esparza analyze the recent emergence of websites run by Latin American militaries, and consider why these militaries choose to advertise their activities on the Internet. Political and Military Sociology also includes reviews of important new books in civil-military relations, political science, and military sociology. Included here are discussions of books about U.S. war crimes in Vietnam, civil-military relations in contemporary China, the structural transformation of the U.S. Army, Japanese security policy, American treatment of POWs, the Bonus March, and the GI Bill. The series will be of broad interest to scholars of civil-military relations, political science, and political sociology. It will continue the tradition of peer review that has guaranteed it a place of importance among research publications in this area.
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About the author

Neovi M. Karakatsanis is professor of political science at Indiana University, South Bend. Her research interests include comparative politics of Southern Europe/Greece, transitions to democracy, and comparative public policy. Her work has appeared in Armed Forces and Society, Classical Bulletin, and Mediterranean Quarterly: A Journal of Global Issues.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Transaction Publishers
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Published on
Dec 31, 2011
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Pages
158
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ISBN
9781412846639
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / General
Political Science / International Relations / General
Social Science / Sociology / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Political and Military Sociology, Volume 41 explores the social elements and impact of national defense. The origin of government is a response to a society’s common interest in security and defense. In recent years, security and defense issues, and government responses, have become increasingly prominent in societies around the world. Despite intermittent pushes for privatization, however, security and defense have remained core functions of government. In this volume Bruce D. McDonald III investigates the historiography of the defense-growth relationship. Lachezar G. Anguelov and Robert J. Eger III consider the social impact with a case study of the Republic of Serbia. Maximiliano Mendieta and Bruce D. McDonald III consider the social spillovers of the sector that arise after the completion of a soldier’s service. Paul Kellogg considers why some countries have fared well when others have been slow to rebound. Hamid E. Ali studies pork barrel spending in the United States. Susan Sample, Brandon Valeriano, and Choong-Nam Kang broaden the understanding of the defense sector to include its output. Hamid E. Ali and Ubah A. Adan conclude the volume with a study on conflict and infant and child mortality rates. Traditionally, national defense is viewed solely in military terms. As part of their national security objectives, many defense sectors have undertaken a variety of social programs. While the existence of social programs is known, what remains uncertain is how they spill over from the sector to society at-large and what is the impact of that spillover.
Political and Military Sociology, Volume 41 explores the social elements and impact of national defense. The origin of government is a response to a society's common interest in security and defense. In recent years, security and defense issues, and government responses, have become increasingly prominent in societies around the world. Despite intermittent pushes for privatization, however, security and defense have remained core functions of government.

In this volume Bruce D. McDonald III investigates the historiography of the defense-growth relationship. Lachezar G. Anguelov and Robert J. Eger III consider the social impact with a case study of the Republic of Serbia. Maximiliano Mendieta and Bruce D. McDonald III consider the social spillovers of the sector that arise after the completion of a soldier's service. Paul Kellogg considers why some countries have fared well when others have been slow to rebound. Hamid E. Ali studies pork barrel spending in the United States. Susan Sample, Brandon Valeriano, and Choong-Nam Kang broaden the understanding of the defense sector to include its output. Hamid E. Ali and Ubah A. Adan conclude the volume with a study on conflict and infant and child mortality rates.

Traditionally, national defense is viewed solely in military terms. As part of their national security objectives, many defense sectors have undertaken a variety of social programs. While the existence of social programs is known, what remains uncertain is how they spill over from the sector to society at-large and what is the impact of that spillover.

I am the translator who has taken journalists into dangerous Darfur. It is my intention now to take you there in this book, if you have the courage to come with me.

The young life of Daoud Hari–his friends call him David–has been one of bravery and mesmerizing adventure. He is a living witness to the brutal genocide under way in Darfur.

The Translator is a suspenseful, harrowing, and deeply moving memoir of how one person has made a difference in the world–an on-the-ground account of one of the biggest stories of our time. Using his high school knowledge of languages as his weapon–while others around him were taking up arms–Daoud Hari has helped inform the world about Darfur.

Hari, a Zaghawa tribesman, grew up in a village in the Darfur region of Sudan. As a child he saw colorful weddings, raced his camels across the desert, and played games in the moonlight after his work was done. In 2003, this traditional life was shattered when helicopter gunships appeared over Darfur’s villages, followed by Sudanese-government-backed militia groups attacking on horseback, raping and murdering citizens and burning villages. Ancient hatreds and greed for natural resources had collided, and the conflagration spread.

Though Hari’s village was attacked and destroyedhis family decimated and dispersed, he himself escaped. Roaming the battlefield deserts on camels, he and a group of his friends helped survivors find food, water, and the way to safety. When international aid groups and reporters arrived, Hari offered his services as a translator and guide. In doing so, he risked his life again and again, for the government of Sudan had outlawed journalists in the region, and death was the punishment for those who aided the “foreign spies.” And then, inevitably, his luck ran out and he was captured. . . .

The Translator tells the remarkable story of a man who came face-to-face with genocide– time and again risking his own life to fight injustice and save his people.


From the Hardcover edition.
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