Digital SLR Photography eLearning Kit For Dummies

John Wiley & Sons
1

Understand and use digital SLR cameras with this complete photography course

If you're making the switch from simple point-and-shoot cameras to more complex dSLRs and hoping to enhance your photography skills along the way, make your next purchase this value-packed eLearning kit. This complete dSLR photography course includes a full-color printed book and a Dummies interactive eLearning course on CD. You'll find a wealth of information on such topics as how to set your camera's exposure controls, composition do's and don't's, and how to apply what you're learning so you take better pictures.

Follow the material sequentially or jump in and out as you wish?it's set up so you can learn at your own pace. Throughout, you will benefit from illustrations, animations, voiceover explanations, and the option of closed captioning if you find you learn better when you can read the instructions.

  • Helps self-motivated learners master digital SLR photography equipment, concepts, terms, and picture-taking basics
  • Includes an easy-to-follow, full-color book and an interactive Dummies eLearning Course that corresponds with the book on CD
  • Allows you to follow the material sequentially or choose separate sections at your own time and pace
  • Offers chapter summaries, practice exercises, discussions of concepts and essential terms, and much more

Get the very most out of your dSLR camera and your photography with Digital SLR Photography eLearning Kit For Dummies.

NOTE:CD-ROM/DVD and other supplementary materials are not included as part of the e-book file, but are available for download after purchase.

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About the author

Mark Holmes is a professional photographer and photography instructor based in San Diego, California. He has over 20 years experience as a photographer and instructional designer and has developed many instructional texts, workshops, and online classes devoted to photography, technology, and media-related subjects. His experience covers commercial photography for leading technology companies, including Hewlett-Packard, while his interest in portrait photography has led to assignments in Japan, Korea, and Qatar.
Mark runs regular workshops on digital photography and also teaches new photographers and other professionals individually. He has a love of sharing the art of photography with others and a passion for his subject. For more information, visit him on the web at markholmesphoto.com.
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Additional Information

Publisher
John Wiley & Sons
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Published on
Jan 9, 2012
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Pages
304
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ISBN
9781118160367
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Photography / Techniques / Cinematography & Videography
Photography / Techniques / Digital
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Stephen Mark Holmes
Sacred Signs in Reformation Scotland is the first study of how public worship was interpreted in Renaissance Scotland and offers a radically new way of understanding the Scottish Reformation. It first defines the history and method of 'liturgical interpretation' (using the methods of medieval Biblical exegesis to explain worship), then shows why it was central to medieval and early modern Western European religious culture. The rest of the book uses Scotland as a case study for a multidisciplinary investigation of the place of liturgical interpretation in this culture. Stephen Mark Holmes uses the methods of 'book history' to discover the place of liturgical interpretation in education, sermons and pastoral practice and also investigates its impact on material culture, especially church buildings and furnishings. A study of books and their owners reveals networks of clergy in Scotland committed to the liturgy and Catholic reform, especially the 'Aberdeen liturgists'. Holmes corrects current scholarship by showing that their influence lasted beyond 1560 and suggests that they created the distinctive religious culture of North-East Scotland (later a centre of Catholic recusancy, Episcopalianism and Jacobitism). The final two chapters investigate what happened to liturgical interpretation in Scottish religious culture after the Protestant Reformation of 1559-60, showing that while it declined in importance in Catholic circles, a Reformed Protestant version of liturgical interpretation was created and flourished which used exactly the same method to produce both an interpretation of the Reformed sacramental rites and an 'anti-commentary' on Catholic liturgy. The book demonstrates an important continuity across the Reformation divide arguing that the 'Scottish Reformation' is best seen as both Catholic and Protestant, with the reformers on both sides having more in common than they or subsequent historians have allowed.
Stephen Mark Holmes
Sacred Signs in Reformation Scotland is the first study of how public worship was interpreted in Renaissance Scotland and offers a radically new way of understanding the Scottish Reformation. It first defines the history and method of 'liturgical interpretation' (using the methods of medieval Biblical exegesis to explain worship), then shows why it was central to medieval and early modern Western European religious culture. The rest of the book uses Scotland as a case study for a multidisciplinary investigation of the place of liturgical interpretation in this culture. Stephen Mark Holmes uses the methods of 'book history' to discover the place of liturgical interpretation in education, sermons and pastoral practice and also investigates its impact on material culture, especially church buildings and furnishings. A study of books and their owners reveals networks of clergy in Scotland committed to the liturgy and Catholic reform, especially the 'Aberdeen liturgists'. Holmes corrects current scholarship by showing that their influence lasted beyond 1560 and suggests that they created the distinctive religious culture of North-East Scotland (later a centre of Catholic recusancy, Episcopalianism and Jacobitism). The final two chapters investigate what happened to liturgical interpretation in Scottish religious culture after the Protestant Reformation of 1559-60, showing that while it declined in importance in Catholic circles, a Reformed Protestant version of liturgical interpretation was created and flourished which used exactly the same method to produce both an interpretation of the Reformed sacramental rites and an 'anti-commentary' on Catholic liturgy. The book demonstrates an important continuity across the Reformation divide arguing that the 'Scottish Reformation' is best seen as both Catholic and Protestant, with the reformers on both sides having more in common than they or subsequent historians have allowed.
Mark Holmes
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