The Struggle for Modern Turkey: Justice, Activism and a Revolutionary Female Journalist

Bloomsbury Publishing
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Sabiha Sertel was born into revolution in 1895, as an independent Turkey rose out of the dying Ottoman Empire. The nation's first professional female journalist, her unrelenting push for democracy and social reforms ultimately cost Sertel her country and freedom.

Shortly before her death in 1968, Sertel completed her autobiography Roman Gibi (Like a Novel), which was written during her forced exile in the Soviet Union. Translated here into English for the first time, and complete with a new introduction and comprehensive annotations, it offers a rare perspective on Turkey's history as it moved to embrace democracy, then violently recoiled. The book reveals the voice of a passionate feminist and committed socialist who clashes with the young republic's leadership. A unique first-hand account, the text foreshadows Turkey's increasingly authoritarian state. Sertel offers her perspective on the fierce divisions over the republic's constitution and covers issues including freedom of the press, women's civil rights and the pre-WWII discussions with European leaders about Hitler's rising power.

More information about the book, photographs, reviews and events can be found at a special website dedicated to the book: www.struggleformodernturkey.com
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About the author

Sabiha Sertel (1895-1968) is considered the first professional female journalist in modern Turkey.

Tia O'Brien is an award-winning reporter and editor based in San Francisco. Her journalism focuses on politics, business and technology, Turkey and consumer affairs.

Nur Deris is a freelance translator and interpreter and worked most recently at the European Masters in Conference Interpreting at Bosphorus University, Istanbul.

David Selim Sayers is a Founding Member of the Paris Institute for Critical Thinking (PICT) and a Lecturer at the Institut National des Langues et Civilisations Orientales (INALCO), Université Sorbonne Paris Cité.

Evrim Emir-Sayers is a Founding Member of the Paris Institute for Critical Thinking (PICT) and worked as a Lecturer in Philosophy at San Francisco State University.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Bloomsbury Publishing
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Published on
Jul 11, 2019
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Pages
288
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ISBN
9781788316002
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / General
History / Middle East / General
History / Middle East / Turkey & Ottoman Empire
Political Science / Political Ideologies / Communism, Post-Communism & Socialism
Social Science / Islamic Studies
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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