Religion and Family in a Changing Society

Princeton University Press
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The 1950s religious boom was organized around the male-breadwinner lifestyle in the burgeoning postwar suburbs. But since the 1950s, family life has been fundamentally reconfigured in the United States. How do religion and family fit together today?

This book examines how religious congregations in America have responded to changes in family structure, and how families participate in local religious life. Based on a study of congregations and community residents in upstate New York, sociologist Penny Edgell argues that while some religious groups may be nostalgic for the Ozzie and Harriet days, others are changing, knowing that fewer and fewer families fit this traditional pattern. In order to keep members with nontraditional family arrangements within the congregation, these innovators have sought to emphasize individual freedom and personal spirituality and actively to welcome single adults and those from nontraditional families.


Edgell shows that mothers and fathers seek involvement in congregations for different reasons. Men tend to think of congregations as social support structures, and to get involved as a means of participating in the lives of their children. Women, by contrast, are more often motivated by the quest for religious experience, and can adapt more readily to pluralist ideas about family structure. This, Edgell concludes, may explain the attraction of men to more conservative congregations, and women to nontraditional religious groups.

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About the author

Penny Edgell is Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Minnesota. She is the author of Congregations in Conflict: Cultural Models of Local Religioius Life, which won the 1999 best book award from the American Sociological Association's religion section.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Princeton University Press
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Published on
Dec 3, 2013
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Pages
232
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ISBN
9781400850761
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Social Science / Sociology / Marriage & Family
Social Science / Sociology of Religion
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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