The Art of the Possible: Diplomatic Alternatives in the Middle East

Princeton University Press
Free sample

The Art of the Possible takes a hard look at the present play of forces in the Middle East. In full awareness of the historical, political, social, and psychological dimensions of the enmities of the region—and its most critical flashpoint, the Arab- Israeli conflict—it seeks realistic answers to the question "What can be done?" For each of the immediate foci of conflict, the author develops and proposes a workable plan: for the Sinai Peninsula, the establishment of a Sinai Development Trust; for the West Bank of the Jordan River, the creation of a Palestinian state; for the Golan Heights, the foundation of a Druze trust territory; and for the city of Jerusalem, the drafting and adoption of an international statute. Emphasizing the need for "unfettered investigation of new political techniques and legal institutions," Professor Reisman exemplifies in this eloquent essay the kind of innovative thinking that alone can create the conditions for a lasting peace in this troubled part of the world.

Originally published in 1970.

The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Princeton University Press
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Published on
Mar 8, 2015
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Pages
170
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ISBN
9781400868384
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / General
Political Science / History & Theory
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

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