Kirby Puckett

Infobase Publishing
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Minnesota Twins' center fielder Kirby Puckett emerged from the rough housing projects of Chicago to become the jewel of Major League Baseball from 1984 to 1995. Better known by Twins fans as Puck, number 34 is still considered by most to be the greatest Twin ever. During his 11-year career, Puckett was a six-time Gold Glove winner, a 10-time All-Star, a five-time Silver Slugger Award winner, and led the Twins to their only two World Series titles in 1987 and 1991. But his remarkable career came to a shocking halt in 1995 when glaucoma caused irreversible damage to his right eye, and in 1997 the Minnesota Twins retired his number. In 2001, he was inducted into National Baseball's Hall of Fame, becoming the sixth player ever to be inducted before age 41. Sadly, in March 2006, Puckett suffered a massive hemorrhagic stroke and died at age 45. Packed with stirring photographs and engaging features accessible for even the most reluctant readers, Kirby Puckett is a fitting tribute to this unforgettable baseball champion.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Infobase Publishing
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Published on
Dec 31, 2009
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Pages
122
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ISBN
9781438100500
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Language
English
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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