Frederick Douglass

Frederick Douglass was an African-American social reformer, orator, writer and statesman. After escaping from slavery, he became a leader of the abolitionist movement, gaining note for his dazzling oratory and incisive antislavery writing. He stood as a living counter-example to slaveholders' arguments that slaves lacked the intellectual capacity to function as independent American citizens. Many Northerners also found it hard to believe that such a great orator had been a slave.
Douglass wrote several autobiographies. He eloquently described his experiences as a slave in his 1845 autobiography, "Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave", which became a bestseller and influential in supporting abolition, as did the second, "My Bondage and My Freedom". After the Civil War, Douglass remained an active campaigner against slavery and wrote his last autobiography, "Life and Times of Frederick Douglass." First published in 1881 and revised in 1892, three years before his death, it covered events through and after the Civil War. Douglass also actively supported women's suffrage, and held several public offices.
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"No people are more talked about and no people seem more imperfectly understood. Those who see us every day seem not to know us."—Frederick Douglass on African Americans

"There is no negro problem. The problem is whether the American people have loyalty enough, honor enough, patriotism enough, to live up to their own constitution."—on civil rights

"Woman should have justice as well as praise, and if she is to dispense with either, she can better afford to part with the latter than the former."—on women

"The thing worse than rebellion is the thing that causes rebellion."—on rebellion

"A man is never lost while he still earnestly thinks himself worth saving; and as with a man, so with a nation."—on perseverance

"I am ever pleased to see a man rise from among the people. Every such man is prophetic of the good time coming."—on Lincoln

Frederick Douglass, a runaway Maryland slave, was witness to and participant in some of the most important events in the history of the American Republic between the years of 1818 and 1895. Beginning his long public career in 1841 as an agent of the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society, Douglass subsequently edited four newspapers and championed many reform movements. An advocate of morality, economic accumulation, self-help, and equality, Douglass supported racial pride, constant agitation against racial discrimination, vocational education for blacks, and nonviolent passive resistance.

He was the only man who played a prominent role at the 1848 meeting in Seneca Falls that formally launched the women's rights movement. He was a temperance advocate and opposed capital punishment, lynching, debt peonage, and the convict lease system. A staunch defender of the Liberty and Republican parties, Douglass held several political appointments, frequently corresponded with leading politicians, and advised Presidents Lincoln, Grant, Hayes, Garfield, and Harrison. He met with John Brown before his abortive raid on Harpers Ferry, helped to recruit African American troops during the Civil War, attended most national black conventions held between 1840 and 1895, and served as U.S. ambassador to Haiti.

Frederick Douglass has left one of the most extensive bodies of significant and quotable public statements of any figure in American history. In the Words of Frederick Douglass is a rich trove of quotations from Douglass. The editors have compiled nearly seven hundred quotations by Douglass that demonstrate the breadth and strength of his intellect as well as the eloquence with which he expressed his political and ethical principles.

This carefully crafted ebook: "Slavery: Not Forgiven, Never Forgotten" is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents: Memoirs Narrative of Frederick Douglass 12 Years a Slave The Underground Railroad Up From Slavery Willie Lynch Letter Confessions of Nat Turner Narrative of Sojourner Truth Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl History of Mary Prince Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom Thirty Years a Slave Narrative of the Life of J. D. Green The Life of Olaudah Equiano Behind The Scenes Harriet: The Moses of Her People Father Henson's Story of His Own Life 50 Years in Chains Twenty-Two Years a Slave and Forty Years a Freeman Narrative of the Life and Adventures of Henry Bibb Narrative of William W. Brown, a Fugitive Slave Story of Mattie J. Jackson A Slave Girl's Story From the Darkness Cometh the Light Narrative of the Life of Moses Grandy Narrative of Joanna Narrative of the Life of Henry Box Brown, Who Escaped in a 3x2 Feet Box Memoir and Poems of Phillis Wheatley Buried Alive (Behind Prison Walls) For a Quarter of a Century Sketches of the Life of Joseph Mountain Novels Oroonoko Uncle Tom's Cabin Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Heroic Slave Slavery's Pleasant Homes Our Nig Clotelle Marrow of Tradition Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man A Fool's Errand Bricks Without Straw Imperium in Imperio The Hindered Hand Historical Documents The History of Abolition of African Slave-Trade History of American Abolitionism Pictures of Slavery in Church and State Life, Last Words and Dying Speech of Stephen Smith Who Was Executed for Burglary Report on Charge of Aiding and Abetting in the Rescue of a Fugitive Slave Southern Horrors: Lynch Law in All Its Phases Duty of Disobedience to the Fugitive Slave Act Emancipation Proclamation (1863) Gettysburg Address XIII Amendment to the U.S. Constitution (1865) Civil Rights Act of 1866 XIV Amendment to the U.S. Constitution (1868) Reconstruction Acts (1867-1868) ...
This carefully crafted ebook: “The Collected Works: A Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave + The Heroic Slave + My Bondage and My Freedom + Life and Times of Frederick Douglass + My Escape from Slavery + Self-Made Men + Speeches & Writings” contains 7 books in one volume and is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents.
1. A Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave is a memoir and treatise on abolition written by former slave, Frederick Douglass. The text, first published in 1845, describes the events of his life and encompasses eleven chapters that recount Douglass' life as a slave and his ambition to become a free man. It is considered to be one of the most influential pieces of literature to fuel the abolitionist movement of the early 19th century in the United States.
2. The Heroic Slave, a heartwarming Narrative of the Adventures of Madison Washington, in Pursuit of Liberty is a short piece of fiction written by famous abolitionist Frederick Douglass. The novella, published in 1852, was Douglass' first and only published work of fiction.
3. My Bondage and My Freedom is an autobiographical slave narrative written by Douglass and published in 1855. The book describes in greater detail his transition from bondage to liberty.
4. Life and Times of Frederick Douglass is Frederick Douglass' third autobiography, published in 1881 and revised in 1892. Because of the emancipation of American slaves during and following the American Civil War, Douglas gave more details about his life as a slave and his escape from slavery in this volume than he could in his two previous autobiographies.
5. My Escape from Slavery was published in 1881 in The Century Illustrated Magazine. His fully revised autobiography was published as Life and Times of Frederick Douglass, also in 1881. In this book Douglass describes in vivid detail his escape by train from Maryland, where he was legally a slave, north to New York City.
6. Self-Made Men is a famous lecture (1895). In this speech he gives his own definition of the self-made man and explains what he thinks are the means to become such a man.
7. The Speeches & Writings section contains 6 seminal texts: What to the Slave is the Fourth of July? (1852) - Reconstruction (1866) - An Appeal to Congress for Impartial Suffrage (1867) - Oration in Memory of Abraham Lincoln (1876) - The Color Line (1881) and The Future of the Colored Race (1886)
Frederick Douglass (1818 – 1895) was an African-American social reformer, orator, writer and statesman. After escaping from slavery, he became a leader of the abolitionist movement, gaining note for his dazzling oratory and incisive antislavery writing.
This unique collection consists of the most influential memoirs - powerful & unflinching narratives of former slaves and stories of people who helped them; including records and letters which unfold all the hardship, hair-breadth escapes and death struggles of the slaves in their efforts to reach freedom: Narrative of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Freedom Fighter & Statesman 12 Years a Slave - Memoir of Solomon Northup, a Free-Born African American Who Was Kidnapped and Sold into Slavery The Underground Railroad (William Still) - stories of 649 slaves who escaped to freedom through a secret network formed by abolitionists and former slaves Harriet: The Moses of Her People – Story of the Woman Who Led Hundreds of Slaves to Freedom as the Conductor on the Underground Railroad Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (Harriet Jacobs) Narrative of Sojourner Truth - leading abolitionist and women's rights activist The Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano - Former Slave, Seaman & Freedom Fighter Up From Slavery, by Booker T. Washington - the Visionary Educator, Leader and Civil Rights Activist The History of Mary Prince, a West Indian Slave – Memoir that Influenced the Anti-Slavery Cause of British Colonies Father Henson's Story of His Own Life – by Josiah Henson who was the inspiration for the character of Tom in Uncle Tom's Cabin Uncle Tom's Cabin, anti-slavery influential novel which made a crucial impact on America's conscience by illustrating slavery's affect on families The Willie Lynch Letter: The Making of Slave! The Confessions of Nat Turner The History of Mary Prince, a West Indian Slave - Autobiography that Influenced the Anti-Slavery Cause of British Colonies Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom (William and Ellen Craft) Thirty Years a Slave: From Bondage to Freedom (Louis Hughes) Narrative of the Life of J. D. Green, a Runaway Slave (Jacob D. Green) Behind The Scenes: 30 Years a Slave & 4 Years in the White House (Elizabeth Keckley)
This unique collection of "SLAVERY: Hundreds of Documented Testimonies of Former Slaves, Influential Memoirs, Records on Living Conditions and Customs in the South & History of Abolitionist Movement" has been designed and formatted to the highest digital standards. Contents: Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass 12 Years a Slave by Solomon Northup The Underground Railroad The Willie Lynch Letter: The Making of Slave! Confessions of Nat Turner Narrative of Sojourner Truth Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, by Harriet Jacobs Harriet: The Moses of Her People History of Mary Prince Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom, by William and Ellen Craft Thirty Years a Slave: From Bondage to Freedom, by Louis Hughes Narrative of the Life of J. D. Green, a Runaway Slave Up From Slavery by Booker T. Washington Narrative of Olaudah Equiano Behind The Scenes - 30 Years a Slave & 4 Years in the White House, by Elizabeth Keckley Father Henson's Story of His Own Life Fifty Years in Chains, by Charles Ball Twenty-Two Years a Slave and Forty Years a Freeman, by Austin Steward Narrative of the Life of Henry Bibb Narrative of William W. Brown, a Fugitive Slave Story of Mattie J. Jackson A Slave Girl's Story, by Kate Drumgoold From the Darkness Cometh the Light, by Lucy A. Delaney Narrative of the Life of Moses Grandy Narrative of Joanna; An Emancipated Slave, of Surinam Narrative of the Life of Henry Box Brown, Who Escaped in a 3x2 Feet Box Memoir and Poems of Phillis Wheatley Buried Alive For a Quarter of a Century - Life of William Walker Pictures of Slavery in Church and State Dying Speech of Stephen Smith Who Was Executed for Burglary Life of Joseph Mountain Charge of Aiding and Abetting in the Rescue of a Fugitive Slave Lynch Law in All Its Phases Duty of Disobedience to the Fugitive Slave Act Captain Canot Pearl Incident: Personal Memoir of Daniel Drayton History of Abolition of African Slave-Trade History of American Abolitionism
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