The Social Employee: How Great Companies Make Social Media Work

McGraw Hill Professional
3
Free sample

Build a successful SOCIAL BUSINESS by empowering the SOCIAL EMPLOYEE

Includes success stories from IBM, AT&T, Dell, Cisco, Southwest Airlines, Adobe, Domo, and Acxiom

"Great brands have always started on the inside, but why are companies taking so long to leverage the great opportunities offered by internal social media? . . . The Social Employee lifts the lid on this potential and provides guidance for businesses everywhere." -- JEZ FRAMPTON, Global Chairman and CEO, Interbrand

"Get a copy of this book for your whole team and get ready for a surge in measurable social media results!" -- MARI SMITH, author, The New Relationship Marketing, and coauthor, Facebook Marketing

"Practical and insightful, The Social Employee is sure to improve your brand-building efforts." -- KEVIN LANE KELLER, E.B. Osborn Professor of Marketing, Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College, and author, Strategic Brand Management

"This book will change how you view the workplace and modern connectivity, and inform your view of how social employees are changing how we work and create value in today's networked economy." -- DAVID ARMANO, Managing Director, Edelman Digital Chicago, and contributor to Harvard Business Review

"The Social Employee makes the compelling argument that most organizations are sadly missing a key opportunity to create a social brand, as well as to build a strong company culture." -- ANN HANDLEY, Chief Content Officer, MarketingProfs.com, and coauthor, Content Rules

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About the author

CHERYL BURGESS and MARK BURGESS are founders of Blue Focus Marketing, an award-winning social branding consultancy and recipient of the 2012 MarketingSherpa Reader's Choice Award for Best Social Media Marketing Blog. Connect via Twitter @ckburgess, @mnburgess, @BlueFocus, @SocialEmployee. www.bluefocusmarketing.com

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Reviews

4.0
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Additional Information

Publisher
McGraw Hill Professional
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Published on
Aug 23, 2013
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Pages
288
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ISBN
9780071816427
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Management
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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What makes us think we can rely on all this technology? What keeps it together today, and how might it work tomorrow? Will we know how to build the next generation—or will we be lulled into a stupor of dependence brought about by its conveniences?

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