Natural Resource Economics: Policy Problems and Contemporary Analysis

Springer Science & Business Media
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When approached by Warren Samuels, the series editor, about organizing a volume on natural resource economics, I was at a loss as to how one might possibly capture in "several major essays plus several shorter comments thereon" all of the diverse activities that fall within this exciting discipline. I was further asked to have the book take an "affirmative but constructively critical look at its subject. " The volume was to be interpretative, it was to be reasonably comprehensive, and yet it was to attempt to present divergent views on the "development, tensions, present status, and, especially, possible lines of development of each field. " Upon reflection, I decided to have the book focus on natural resource economics as a distinctly applied policy science. Hence the title: Natural Resource Economics: Policy Problems and Contemporary Analysis. While this allowed clarification of a particular sort, it did little to narrow the range of policy issues that ought to be considered candidates for inclu sion. But it did seem, after some thought, that three broad issues persist at center stage in natural resource policy.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Springer Science & Business Media
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Published on
Dec 6, 2012
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Pages
256
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ISBN
9789401174268
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Economics / General
Business & Economics / Environmental Economics
Business & Economics / General
Business & Economics / Industries / Agribusiness
Technology & Engineering / Agriculture / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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