The Zookeeper's Wife: A War Story

W. W. Norton & Company
139
Free sample

The New York Times bestseller soon to be a major motion picture starring Jessica Chastain.

A true story in which the keepers of the Warsaw Zoo saved hundreds of people from Nazi hands.

After their zoo was bombed, Polish zookeepers Jan and Antonina Zabinski managed to save over three hundred people from the Nazis by hiding refugees in the empty animal cages. With animal names for these "guests," and human names for the animals, it's no wonder that the zoo's code name became "The House Under a Crazy Star." Best-selling naturalist and acclaimed storyteller Diane Ackerman combines extensive research and an exuberant writing style to re-create this fascinating, true-life story—sharing Antonina's life as "the zookeeper's wife," while examining the disturbing obsessions at the core of Nazism. Winner of the 2008 Orion Award.
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About the author

Diane Ackerman has been the finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Nonfiction in addition to many other awards and recognitions for her work, which include the best-selling The Zookeeper's Wife and A Natural History of the Senses. She lives in Ithaca, New York.

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Reviews

3.7
139 total
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Additional Information

Publisher
W. W. Norton & Company
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Published on
Sep 17, 2008
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Pages
384
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ISBN
9780393069358
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Europe / Eastern
History / Holocaust
History / Military / World War II
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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