The Glorious Vegetables of Italy

Chronicle Books
7
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This book is a tribute to Italy's many glorious vegetables, from the bright, orange-fleshed pumpkins of autumn to the tender green fava beans of early spring. Organized by course, this lavishly photographed cookbook lauds the latest dining trend—the vegetable's starring role at the center of the plate. Cooks of all skill levels will enjoy more than 100 recipes mixing tradition and innovation, ranging from the basics (Fresh Spinach Pasta Dough and Fresh Tomato Sauce) to the seasonal (Spring Risotto with Green and White Asparagus) to savory (Grilled Lamb Spiedini on a Bed of Caponata) and sweet (Pumpkin Gelato). This indispensable recipe collection will appeal to Italian cuisine lovers looking to celebrate vegetables in any meal, every day.
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About the author

Domenica Marchetti is a published food writer and author of three other Italian cookbooks, including The Glorious Pasta of Italy. She lives in Arlington, Virginia.

Sang An is a Korean-born photographer who specializes in food, interior, and still life photography. He lives in New York City.

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4.6
7 total
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Additional Information

Publisher
Chronicle Books
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Published on
Aug 20, 2013
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Pages
272
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ISBN
9781452129648
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Language
English
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Genres
Cooking / Regional & Ethnic / Italian
Cooking / Specific Ingredients / Vegetables
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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It’s a heartfelt celebration of family dinners—the comforting, delicious food that memories are made of—by the new doyenne of Southern cooking. Christy Jordan is a former editor-at-large of Southern Living, a contributing editor to Taste of the South, and publisher of the wildly popular blog SouthernPlate.com—boasting nearly 1 million unique visitors per month, over 60,000 e-newsletter subscribers, and more than 50,000 Facebook fans. She’s appeared on TODAY, Paula Deen, and QVC, among many other media outlets, and her first book, Southern Plate (William Morrow), has 107,000 copies in print.

Conceived and written to reflect the reality of today’s hectic schedules—and the need to gather around the dinner table—Come Home to Supper offers more than 200 deeply satisfying dishes that are budget-minded, kid-friendly, and quick. These are the everyday meals that Christy Jordan most loves to cook, and her family most loves to eat, and she serves them up with generous helpings of her folksy wisdom, gratitude, and lively stories.

Many of the recipes make ingenious use of the slow cooker or a single pot or skillet; require easily found supermarket ingredients; and are packed with time-saving tips and shortcuts. And the menu, well, it’s all good, includingCrispy Breaded Pork Chops with Milk Gravy, Beef and Broccoli,Spicy Fried Chicken,Craving Beans, Summer Corn Salad, Slow Cooker Baked Apples,Ice Cream Rolls, andCinnamon Pudding Cobbler. Or to put it like Christy Jordan, food to make your family “smile louder.”
Eliza Action’s masterpiece set out the fundamentals of domestic English cookery and offered a wealth of dishes for every occasion. The recipes are a model of sensible instruction for preparing food simply but well. This authoritative book was not only a guide to the best English cooking, but unusually for the time, it also contained recipes for German, Indian, and Caribbean dishes. Acton’s book introduced the now-universal practice of listing ingredients and suggested cooking times for each recipe, and it included the first print recipe for Brussels Sprouts. Original illustrations and instructions on basic techniques ranging from frying fish to roasting meat conveyed in Acton’s elegant prose make the book a quintessential tome packed full of wisdom, common sense, and culinary delights.
No wonder the doyenne of American woman’s affairs, the editor of the most influential and widely read magazine of the day, Godey’s Lady’s Book, chose to adapt the book for her American readers. In her preface, Sarah Hale gushes that the work is well adapted to the wants of this country at the present time, and that it is so complete she has little to add except regarding preparation of foods that are more strictly American such as Indian Corn, Terrapin, and others. She carefully marked her additional matter in brackets, and she did revise some articles and terms not generally known here. The result is a treasury of international cuisine written by two experts that was published and reprinted for decades.
This edition of Modern Cookery, in All Its Branches was reproduced by permission from the volume in the collection of the American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, Massachusetts. Founded in 1812 by Isaiah Thomas, a Revolutionary War patriot and successful printer and publisher, the society is a research library documenting the lives of Americans from the colonial era through 1876. The society collects, preserves, and makes available as complete a record as possible of the printed materials from the early American experience. The cookbook collection comprises approximately 1,100 volumes.
This is the first English translation of Apicius de re Coquinaria, the oldest known cookbook in existence. It is also one of the few translations of this original Roman cookbook prepared by a professional chef. Joseph Vehling's brilliant translation, extended introduction, and full and helpful commentary combine to bring you a clear picture of what foods the Romans ate, how they prepared them, and the highly developed state of culinary arts in Imperial Rome.
There are recipes for cooking fish and seafood, game, chicken, pork, veal, and other domesticated animals and birds, for vegetable dishes, grains, beverages, and sauces; virtually the full range of cookery is covered. There are also methods for preserving foods, revitalizing them, even adulterating them. Some of the recipes are strikingly modern; others use ingredients and methods that have long since disappeared.
As the book was originally written for professional cooks working in Rome (perhaps made even more obscure to prevent amateurs from gaining access to the recipes), Joseph Vehling's generous notes are essential for understanding the ingredients and methods used in the recipes and the relationship of Roman cooking to our own traditions.
Besides the translation and notes there is much other material, both scholarly and informative, covering cooking in the ancient world, the history and bibliography of Apicius manuscripts and editions, an index and vocabulary of Roman cookery terms, 49 illustrations including drawings by the author and facsimiles from earlier editions, and much more. Needless to say, you couldn't find this information anywhere else.
This rare book will appeal to gourmets, professional and amateur chefs, cultural historians, and others who want to see, first hand, the foods on which Imperial Rome dined. It will clear up many myths about Roman cooking and will provide a great deal of enjoyable reading as well.
Deb Perelman, award-winning blogger and New York Times best-selling author of The Smitten Kitchen Cookbook, understands that a happy discovery in the kitchen has the ability to completely change the course of your day. Whether we’re cooking for ourselves, for a date night in, for a Sunday supper with friends, or for family on a busy weeknight, we all want recipes that are unfussy to make with triumphant results.

Deb thinks that cooking should be an escape from drudgery. Smitten Kitchen Every Day: Triumphant and Unfussy New Favorites presents more than one hundred impossible-to-resist recipes—almost all of them brand-new, plus a few favorites from her website—that will make you want to stop what you’re doing right now and cook. These are real recipes for real people—people with busy lives who don’t want to sacrifice flavor or quality to eat meals they’re really excited about.

You’ll want to put these recipes in your Forever Files: Sticky Toffee Waffles (sticky toffee pudding you can eat for breakfast), Everything Drop Biscuits with Cream Cheese, and Magical Two-Ingredient Oat Brittle (a happy accident). There’s a (hopelessly, unapologetically inauthentic) Kale Caesar with Broken Eggs and Crushed Croutons, a Mango Apple Ceviche with Sunflower Seeds, and a Grandma-Style Chicken Noodle Soup that fixes everything. You can make Leek, Feta, and Greens Spiral Pie, crunchy Brussels and Three Cheese Pasta Bake that tastes better with brussels sprouts than without, Beefsteak Skirt Steak Salad, and Bacony Baked Pintos with the Works (as in, giant bowls of beans that you can dip into like nachos).

And, of course, no meal is complete without cake (and cookies and pies and puddings): Chocolate Peanut Butter Icebox Cake (the icebox cake to end all icebox cakes), Pretzel Linzers with Salted Caramel, Strawberry Cloud Cookies, Bake Sale Winning-est Gooey Oat Bars, as well as the ultimate Party Cake Builder—four one-bowl cakes for all occasions with mix-and-match frostings (bonus: less time spent doing dishes means everybody wins).

Written with Deb’s trademark humor and gorgeously illustrated with her own photographs, Smitten Kitchen Every Day is filled with what are sure to be your new favorite things to cook.
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