Fourier Analysis: An Introduction

Princeton University Press
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This first volume, a three-part introduction to the subject, is intended for students with a beginning knowledge of mathematical analysis who are motivated to discover the ideas that shape Fourier analysis. It begins with the simple conviction that Fourier arrived at in the early nineteenth century when studying problems in the physical sciences--that an arbitrary function can be written as an infinite sum of the most basic trigonometric functions.

The first part implements this idea in terms of notions of convergence and summability of Fourier series, while highlighting applications such as the isoperimetric inequality and equidistribution. The second part deals with the Fourier transform and its applications to classical partial differential equations and the Radon transform; a clear introduction to the subject serves to avoid technical difficulties. The book closes with Fourier theory for finite abelian groups, which is applied to prime numbers in arithmetic progression.

In organizing their exposition, the authors have carefully balanced an emphasis on key conceptual insights against the need to provide the technical underpinnings of rigorous analysis. Students of mathematics, physics, engineering and other sciences will find the theory and applications covered in this volume to be of real interest.

The Princeton Lectures in Analysis represents a sustained effort to introduce the core areas of mathematical analysis while also illustrating the organic unity between them. Numerous examples and applications throughout its four planned volumes, of which Fourier Analysis is the first, highlight the far-reaching consequences of certain ideas in analysis to other fields of mathematics and a variety of sciences. Stein and Shakarchi move from an introduction addressing Fourier series and integrals to in-depth considerations of complex analysis; measure and integration theory, and Hilbert spaces; and, finally, further topics such as functional analysis, distributions and elements of probability theory.

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About the author

Elias M. Stein is Professor of Mathematics at Princeton University. Rami Shakarchi received his Ph.D. in Mathematics from Princeton University in 2002.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Princeton University Press
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Published on
Feb 11, 2011
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Pages
328
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ISBN
9781400831234
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Language
English
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Genres
Mathematics / Functional Analysis
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Elias M. Stein
Francis J. Flanigan
A caution to mathematics professors: Complex Variables does not follow conventional outlines of course material. One reviewer noting its originality wrote: "A standard text is often preferred [to a superior text like this] because the professor knows the order of topics and the problems, and doesn't really have to pay attention to the text. He can go to class without preparation." Not so here — Dr. Flanigan treats this most important field of contemporary mathematics in a most unusual way. While all the material for an advanced undergraduate or first-year graduate course is covered, discussion of complex algebra is delayed for 100 pages, until harmonic functions have been analyzed from a real variable viewpoint. Students who have forgotten or never dealt with this material will find it useful for the subsequent functions. In addition, analytic functions are defined in a way which simplifies the subsequent theory. Contents include: Calculus in the Plane, Harmonic Functions in the Plane, Complex Numbers and Complex Functions, Integrals of Analytic Functions, Analytic Functions and Power Series, Singular Points and Laurent Series, The Residue Theorem and the Argument Principle, and Analytic Functions as Conformal Mappings.
Those familiar with mathematics texts will note the fine illustrations throughout and large number of problems offered at the chapter ends. An answer section is provided. Students weary of plodding mathematical prose will find Professor Flanigan's style as refreshing and stimulating as his approach.
Elias M. Stein
With this second volume, we enter the intriguing world of complex analysis. From the first theorems on, the elegance and sweep of the results is evident. The starting point is the simple idea of extending a function initially given for real values of the argument to one that is defined when the argument is complex. From there, one proceeds to the main properties of holomorphic functions, whose proofs are generally short and quite illuminating: the Cauchy theorems, residues, analytic continuation, the argument principle.

With this background, the reader is ready to learn a wealth of additional material connecting the subject with other areas of mathematics: the Fourier transform treated by contour integration, the zeta function and the prime number theorem, and an introduction to elliptic functions culminating in their application to combinatorics and number theory.

Thoroughly developing a subject with many ramifications, while striking a careful balance between conceptual insights and the technical underpinnings of rigorous analysis, Complex Analysis will be welcomed by students of mathematics, physics, engineering and other sciences.

The Princeton Lectures in Analysis represents a sustained effort to introduce the core areas of mathematical analysis while also illustrating the organic unity between them. Numerous examples and applications throughout its four planned volumes, of which Complex Analysis is the second, highlight the far-reaching consequences of certain ideas in analysis to other fields of mathematics and a variety of sciences. Stein and Shakarchi move from an introduction addressing Fourier series and integrals to in-depth considerations of complex analysis; measure and integration theory, and Hilbert spaces; and, finally, further topics such as functional analysis, distributions and elements of probability theory.

Steve Awodey
Elias M. Stein
Real Analysis is the third volume in the Princeton Lectures in Analysis, a series of four textbooks that aim to present, in an integrated manner, the core areas of analysis. Here the focus is on the development of measure and integration theory, differentiation and integration, Hilbert spaces, and Hausdorff measure and fractals. This book reflects the objective of the series as a whole: to make plain the organic unity that exists between the various parts of the subject, and to illustrate the wide applicability of ideas of analysis to other fields of mathematics and science.

After setting forth the basic facts of measure theory, Lebesgue integration, and differentiation on Euclidian spaces, the authors move to the elements of Hilbert space, via the L2 theory. They next present basic illustrations of these concepts from Fourier analysis, partial differential equations, and complex analysis. The final part of the book introduces the reader to the fascinating subject of fractional-dimensional sets, including Hausdorff measure, self-replicating sets, space-filling curves, and Besicovitch sets. Each chapter has a series of exercises, from the relatively easy to the more complex, that are tied directly to the text. A substantial number of hints encourage the reader to take on even the more challenging exercises.

As with the other volumes in the series, Real Analysis is accessible to students interested in such diverse disciplines as mathematics, physics, engineering, and finance, at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.

Also available, the first two volumes in the Princeton Lectures in Analysis:

Rami Shakarchi
Rami Shakarchi
The present volume contains all the exercises and their solutions for Lang's second edition of Undergraduate Analysis. The wide variety of exercises, which range from computational to more conceptual and which are of vary ing difficulty, cover the following subjects and more: real numbers, limits, continuous functions, differentiation and elementary integration, normed vector spaces, compactness, series, integration in one variable, improper integrals, convolutions, Fourier series and the Fourier integral, functions in n-space, derivatives in vector spaces, the inverse and implicit mapping theorem, ordinary differential equations, multiple integrals, and differential forms. My objective is to offer those learning and teaching analysis at the undergraduate level a large number of completed exercises and I hope that this book, which contains over 600 exercises covering the topics mentioned above, will achieve my goal. The exercises are an integral part of Lang's book and I encourage the reader to work through all of them. In some cases, the problems in the beginning chapters are used in later ones, for example, in Chapter IV when one constructs-bump functions, which are used to smooth out singulari ties, and prove that the space of functions is dense in the space of regu lated maps. The numbering of the problems is as follows. Exercise IX. 5. 7 indicates Exercise 7, §5, of Chapter IX. Acknowledgments I am grateful to Serge Lang for his help and enthusiasm in this project, as well as for teaching me mathematics (and much more) with so much generosity and patience.
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