Filtrations on the Homology of Algebraic Varieties: Issue 529

American Mathematical Soc.
Free sample

This work provides a detailed exposition of a classical topic from a very recent viewpoint. Friedlander and Mazur describe some foundational aspects of 'Lawson homology' for complex projective algebraic varieties, a homology theory defined in terms of homotopy groups of spaces of algebraic cycles. Attention is paid to methods of group completing abelian topological monoids. The authors study properties of Chow varieties, especially in connection with algebraic correspondences relating algebraic varieties. Operations on Lawson homology are introduced and analyzed. These operations lead to a filtration on the singular homology of algebraic varieties, which is identified in terms of correspondences and related to classical filtrations of Hodge and Grothendieck.
Read more

About the author

Friedlander is Professor of Mathematics at Northwestern University.

Read more
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
American Mathematical Soc.
Read more
Published on
Dec 31, 1994
Read more
Pages
110
Read more
ISBN
9780821825914
Read more
Read more
Best For
Read more
Language
English
Read more
Genres
Mathematics / General
Read more
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
Circles Disturbed brings together important thinkers in mathematics, history, and philosophy to explore the relationship between mathematics and narrative. The book's title recalls the last words of the great Greek mathematician Archimedes before he was slain by a Roman soldier--"Don't disturb my circles"--words that seem to refer to two radically different concerns: that of the practical person living in the concrete world of reality, and that of the theoretician lost in a world of abstraction. Stories and theorems are, in a sense, the natural languages of these two worlds--stories representing the way we act and interact, and theorems giving us pure thought, distilled from the hustle and bustle of reality. Yet, though the voices of stories and theorems seem totally different, they share profound connections and similarities.

A book unlike any other, Circles Disturbed delves into topics such as the way in which historical and biographical narratives shape our understanding of mathematics and mathematicians, the development of "myths of origins" in mathematics, the structure and importance of mathematical dreams, the role of storytelling in the formation of mathematical intuitions, the ways mathematics helps us organize the way we think about narrative structure, and much more.


In addition to the editors, the contributors are Amir Alexander, David Corfield, Peter Galison, Timothy Gowers, Michael Harris, David Herman, Federica La Nave, G.E.R. Lloyd, Uri Margolin, Colin McLarty, Jan Christoph Meister, Arkady Plotnitsky, and Bernard Teissier.

©2018 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.