Case Files Cardiology

McGraw Hill Professional
3

ENHANCE YOUR CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS AND IMPROVE PATIENT CARE WITH THIS CONCISE CASE-BASED REVIEW

Experience with clinical cases is key to mastering the art and science of medicine and ultimately to providing patients with competent clinical care. Case Files: Cardiology provides 30 real-life cases that illustrate essential concepts in cardiac care. Each case includes an easy-to-understand discussion correlated to key concepts, definitions of key terms, clinical pearls, and board-style review questions to reinforce your learning. With Case Files, you'll learn instead of memorize.

  • Learn from 30 high-yield cases, each with board-style questions
  • Master key concepts with clinical pearls
  • Sharpen your clinical problem-solving and patient care skills

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About the author

Eugene C. Toy (Houston, TX) is a duel-certified family physician and obstetrician-gynecologist. He is academic director at Methodist Hospital in Houston.

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Additional Information

Publisher
McGraw Hill Professional
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Published on
Nov 22, 2014
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Pages
368
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ISBN
9780071799201
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Language
English
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Genres
Medical / Clinical Medicine
Medical / Internal Medicine
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Reading information

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A rigorous, high-yield review for the new ABA Part 1: BASIC Examination

The year 2014 marks the beginning of a new phase in board certification for anesthesiology residents in the United States. The Part 1 exam is now split into two written examinations: Basic and Advanced. Anesthesiology. Residents who are unable to pass the Basic examination will not be allowed to finish their training. That's why this book is a true must read for every anesthesiology resident. It is the single best way to take the stress out of this make-or-break exam, focus your study on nearly 200 must-know topics found on the board exam outline, and identify your areas of strength and weakness.

Written by program directors with many years of board examination advising experience, Anesthesiology Core Review Part One: BASIC Exam is designed to be the cornerstone of your study preparation. Each chapter of Anesthesiology Core Review succinctly summarizes key concepts in basic science and clinical anesthesia practice. Space is conveniently provided throughout the book to add notes from other study resources.

Anesthesiology Core Review Part One: BASIC Exam is logical divided into four sections:

Basic Science Clinical Sciences Organ-Based Sciences Special Issues in Anesthesiology (covering important topics such as professionalism and licensure, ethics, and patient safety)

With its expert authorship and concise yet thorough coverage, Anesthesiology Core Review Part One: BASIC Exam is biggest step you can take to assure effective preparation for the new ABA BASIC Examination.

 

The inspiration for this basic science series occurred at an educational retreat

led by Dr. Maximilian Buja, who at the time was the dean of the medical

school. It has been such a joy to work together with Drs. William Seifert and

Henry Strobel, who are both accomplished scientists and teachers, as well as

the other excellent authors and contributors. It has been rewarding to collaborate

with Dr. Konrad Harms, whom I have watched mature from a medical student

to resident and now a brilliant faculty member. I would like to thank

McGraw-Hill for believing in the concept of teaching by clinical cases. I owe

a great debt to Catherine Johnson, who has been a fantastically encouraging

and enthusiastic editor.

At the University of Texas Medical School at Houston, we would like to recognize

Dr. Rodney E. Kellems, Chair of the Department of Biochemistry and

Molecular Biology, for his encouragement and delight in this project; Johnna

Kincaid, former Director of Management Operations for her support; Nina

Smith and Bonnie Martinez for their help in preparing the manuscript; and Amy

Gilbert for her assistance with the figures. We also would like to thank the many

students that have allowed us to teach them over the years and who have in the

process taught us. Dr. Seifert thanks his wife Margie for her encouragement,

patience, and support.

At Methodist Hospital, I appreciate Drs. Mark Boom, Karin Pollock-Larsen,

H. Dirk Sostman, and Judy Paukert, and Mr. John Lyle and Mr. Reggie Abraham.

At St. Joseph Medical Center, I would like to recognize our outstanding administrators:

Phil Robinson, Pat Mathews, Laura Fortin, Dori Upton, Cecile

Reynolds, and Drs. John Bertini and Thomas V. Taylor. I appreciate Marla

Buffington’s advice and assistance. Without the help from my colleagues, Drs.

Konrad Harms, Jeané Simmons Holmes, and Priti Schachel, this book could not

have been written. Most important, I am humbled by the love, affection, and

encouragement from my lovely wife, Terri and our four children, Andy, Michael,

Allison, and Christina.

Eugene C. Toy

Copyright © 2008 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Click here for terms of use.

This pageOften, the medical student will cringe at the “drudgery” of the basic science

courses and see little connection between a field such as biochemistry and clinical

problems. Clinicians, however, often wish they knew more about the basic

sciences, because it is through the science that we can begin to understand the

complexities of the human body and thus have rational methods of diagnosis

and treatment.

Mastering the knowledge in a discipline such as biochemistry is a formidable

task. It is even more difficult to retain this information and to recall it when the

clinical setting is encountered. To accomplish this synthesis, biochemistry is

optimally taught in the context of medical situations, and this is reinforced later

during the clinical rotations. The gulf between the basic sciences and the patient

arena is wide. Perhaps one way to bridge this gulf is with carefully constructed

clinical cases that ask basic science-oriented questions. In an attempt to achieve

this goal, we have designed a collection of patient cases to teach biochemistry

related points. More importantly, the explanations for these cases emphasize the

underlying mechanisms and relate the clinical setting to the basic science data.

We explore the principles rather than emphasize rote memorization.

This book is organized for versatility: to allow the student “in a rush” to go

quickly through the scenarios and check the corresponding answers and to

provide more detailed information for the student who wants thought-provoking

explanations. The answers are arranged from simple to complex: a summary

of the pertinent points, the bare answers, a clinical correlation, an approach to

the biochemistry topic, a comprehension test at the end to reinforcement or

emphasis, and a list of references for further reading. The clinical cases are

arranged by system to better reflect the organization within the basic science.

Finally, to encourage thinking about mechanisms and relationships, we intentionally

did not primarily use a multiple-choice format. Nevertheless, several

multiple-choice questions are included at the end of each scenario to reinforce

concepts or introduce related topics.

HOW TO GET THE MOST OUT OF THIS BOOK

Each case is designed to introduce a clinically related issue and includes openended

questions usually asking a basic science question, but at times, to break

up the monotony, there will be a clinical question. The answers are organized

into four different parts:

xiii

Copyright © 2008 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Click here for terms of use.

 

 

The inspiration for this basic science series occurred at an educational retreat

led by Dr. Maximilian Buja, who at the time was the dean of the medical

school. It has been such a joy to work together with Drs. William Seifert and

Henry Strobel, who are both accomplished scientists and teachers, as well as

the other excellent authors and contributors. It has been rewarding to collaborate

with Dr. Konrad Harms, whom I have watched mature from a medical student

to resident and now a brilliant faculty member. I would like to thank

McGraw-Hill for believing in the concept of teaching by clinical cases. I owe

a great debt to Catherine Johnson, who has been a fantastically encouraging

and enthusiastic editor.

At the University of Texas Medical School at Houston, we would like to recognize

Dr. Rodney E. Kellems, Chair of the Department of Biochemistry and

Molecular Biology, for his encouragement and delight in this project; Johnna

Kincaid, former Director of Management Operations for her support; Nina

Smith and Bonnie Martinez for their help in preparing the manuscript; and Amy

Gilbert for her assistance with the figures. We also would like to thank the many

students that have allowed us to teach them over the years and who have in the

process taught us. Dr. Seifert thanks his wife Margie for her encouragement,

patience, and support.

At Methodist Hospital, I appreciate Drs. Mark Boom, Karin Pollock-Larsen,

H. Dirk Sostman, and Judy Paukert, and Mr. John Lyle and Mr. Reggie Abraham.

At St. Joseph Medical Center, I would like to recognize our outstanding administrators:

Phil Robinson, Pat Mathews, Laura Fortin, Dori Upton, Cecile

Reynolds, and Drs. John Bertini and Thomas V. Taylor. I appreciate Marla

Buffington’s advice and assistance. Without the help from my colleagues, Drs.

Konrad Harms, Jeané Simmons Holmes, and Priti Schachel, this book could not

have been written. Most important, I am humbled by the love, affection, and

encouragement from my lovely wife, Terri and our four children, Andy, Michael,

Allison, and Christina.

Eugene C. Toy

Copyright © 2008 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Click here for terms of use.

This pageOften, the medical student will cringe at the “drudgery” of the basic science

courses and see little connection between a field such as biochemistry and clinical

problems. Clinicians, however, often wish they knew more about the basic

sciences, because it is through the science that we can begin to understand the

complexities of the human body and thus have rational methods of diagnosis

and treatment.

Mastering the knowledge in a discipline such as biochemistry is a formidable

task. It is even more difficult to retain this information and to recall it when the

clinical setting is encountered. To accomplish this synthesis, biochemistry is

optimally taught in the context of medical situations, and this is reinforced later

during the clinical rotations. The gulf between the basic sciences and the patient

arena is wide. Perhaps one way to bridge this gulf is with carefully constructed

clinical cases that ask basic science-oriented questions. In an attempt to achieve

this goal, we have designed a collection of patient cases to teach biochemistry

related points. More importantly, the explanations for these cases emphasize the

underlying mechanisms and relate the clinical setting to the basic science data.

We explore the principles rather than emphasize rote memorization.

This book is organized for versatility: to allow the student “in a rush” to go

quickly through the scenarios and check the corresponding answers and to

provide more detailed information for the student who wants thought-provoking

explanations. The answers are arranged from simple to complex: a summary

of the pertinent points, the bare answers, a clinical correlation, an approach to

the biochemistry topic, a comprehension test at the end to reinforcement or

emphasis, and a list of references for further reading. The clinical cases are

arranged by system to better reflect the organization within the basic science.

Finally, to encourage thinking about mechanisms and relationships, we intentionally

did not primarily use a multiple-choice format. Nevertheless, several

multiple-choice questions are included at the end of each scenario to reinforce

concepts or introduce related topics.

HOW TO GET THE MOST OUT OF THIS BOOK

Each case is designed to introduce a clinically related issue and includes openended

questions usually asking a basic science question, but at times, to break

up the monotony, there will be a clinical question. The answers are organized

into four different parts:

xiii

Copyright © 2008 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Click here for terms of use.

 

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