Genetics of the Fowl: The Classic Guide to Chicken Genetics and Poultry Breeding

Norton Creek Press
3
Free sample

Genetics of the Fowl is still the most useful work on poultry genetics. Just the last chapter, Genetics in Practice, provides the best introduction to successful poultry breeding ever written, covering the difference between breeding for dominant vs. recessive characteristics, individual selection vs. progeny testing, inbreeding vs. crossing, and much more. 

Hutt was sympathetic to the needs of practical farmers, show breeders, and researchers, so this book is far more than a compendium of genes, and yet this aspect is covered in loving detail. Chapters include the genetics of plumage, egg production, body type, disease resistance, and much more, with many illustrations of how the genes work in practice. 

Other works have come and gone since Genetics of the Fowl's first publication in 1947, but Genetics of the Fowl is still the first book everyone should read on poultry genetics. New information has come to light since its publication, but it builds upon the solid foundation laid down by Hutt. 

This Norton Creek Press book is an exact reproduction of the original edition.

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About the author

Frederick Bruce Hutt's career in scientific writing began at age 8. At 35, he became the youngest president of the Poultry Science Association. He researched, taught, and wrote extensively. He published more than 250 papers and articles, some intended for audiences of farmers and poultry hobbyists and others intended for researchers and geneticists. His clear, well-organized style won him a warm welcome with all audiences. 

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Additional Information

Publisher
Norton Creek Press
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Published on
May 31, 2003
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Pages
604
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ISBN
9780972177030
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Pets / Birds
Science / Life Sciences / Genetics & Genomics
Technology & Engineering / Agriculture / Animal Husbandry
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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On September 6, 2007, an African Grey parrot named Alex died prematurely at age thirty-one. His last words to his owner, Irene Pepperberg, were "You be good. I love you."

What would normally be a quiet, very private event was, in Alex's case, headline news. Over the thirty years they had worked together, Alex and Irene had become famous—two pioneers who opened an unprecedented window into the hidden yet vast world of animal minds. Alex's brain was the size of a shelled walnut, and when Irene and Alex first met, birds were not believed to possess any potential for language, consciousness, or anything remotely comparable to human intelligence. Yet, over the years, Alex proved many things. He could add. He could sound out words. He understood concepts like bigger, smaller, more, fewer, and none. He was capable of thought and intention. Together, Alex and Irene uncovered a startling reality: We live in a world populated by thinking, conscious creatures.

The fame that resulted was extraordinary. Yet there was a side to their relationship that never made the papers. They were emotionally connected to one another. They shared a deep bond far beyond science. Alex missed Irene when she was away. He was jealous when she paid attention to other parrots, or even people. He liked to show her who was boss. He loved to dance. He sometimes became bored by the repetition of his tests, and played jokes on her. Sometimes they sniped at each other. Yet nearly every day, they each said, "I love you."

Alex and Irene stayed together through thick and thin—despite sneers from experts, extraordinary financial sacrifices, and a nomadic existence from one univer­sity to another. The story of their thirty-year adventure is equally a landmark of scientific achievement and of an unforgettable human-animal bond.

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