Kritik der kausalwissenschaftlichen Sozialforschung: Untersuchungen zur Grundlegung von Soziologie und Ökonomie

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Anmerkungen zu Kapitell 1 Vgl. hierzu z.B. Ezekiel/Fox, Methods of Correlation and Regression Analysis, New York 1966; Rao/Miller, Applied Econometrics, Belmont 1971; PindyckiRubinfeld, Econometric Models and Economic Forecasts, New York 1976. 2 Vgl. hierzu z.B.L. Robbins, Tbe Nature and Significance of Economic Science, London 1935; L. v. Mises, Human Action. A Treatise on Economics, Chicago 1966. - Die Kritik der logischen (Gegensatz: mathematischen) ökonomen verdient darum besonders hervorgeho ben zu werden, weil sie deudich macht, daß es keineswegs - wie von ökonometrikem regel mäßig behauptet - um die Alternative, mathematische vs.literarische ökonomie' geht. 3 Vgl. H. Blalock, Causal Inferences in non-experimental research, Chapel Hili 1964; ders., Tbeory Construction, Englewood Cliffs 1969; ders. (ed.), Causal Models in the Social Sciences, Chicago 1971; Namboodiri/Carter/B1alock, Applied Multivariate Analysis and Experimental Design, New York 1975; 0.0. Duncan, Path-analysis: sociological examples, in: Blalock (ed.) 1971; ders., Introduction to Structural Equation Models, New York 1975; Goldberger/Duncan, (eds.) Structural Equation Models in the Social Sciences, New York 1973; außerdem vgl. D. Heise, Causal Analysis, New York 1975.
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Publisher
Springer-Verlag
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Published on
Sep 3, 2013
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Pages
108
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ISBN
9783663143765
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Language
German
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Genres
Political Science / Public Policy / Economic Policy
Political Science / Public Policy / Social Policy
Social Science / General
Social Science / Sociology / General
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Die zunehmende Instrumentalisierung von Musik als Marketinginstrument und die Inszenierung urbaner Konglomerate als »Music Cities« dienen vor allem dem neoliberalen »City Branding«. Die komplexen Zusammenhänge zwischen Musik und Stadt wurden bislang nur punktuell untersucht. Dieser transdisziplinäre Band mit Beiträgen international renommierter Autoren und Autorinnen verbindet theoretische Grundlagen mit empirischen Ergebnissen, ausgewählten Fallstudien und historischen Abhandlungen. Mit der Fokussierung auf die Musik erweitert das Buch nicht nur den gängigen Diskurs um »Creative Cities«, sondern bringt auch wichtige Impulse für die kulturpolitische Praxis. Der Band enthält folgende Beiträge: Volker Kirchberg, Alenka Barber-Kersovan, Robin Kuchar, Music City - Musikalische Annäherung an die kreative Stadt (Vorwort) Adam Krims, What Is a Musically Creative City? Simon Frith, Musical Creativity as a Social Fact Alenka-Barber-Kersovan, Topos Musikstadt als Politikum - Eine historische Perspektive Bastian Lange, Konfigurationen von Wertschöpfung - Musikproduktion zwischen Orten und Szenen Andy Bennett, Popular Music, the Peripheral City and Cultural Memory - A Case Study of Perth, Australia Martin Cloonan, Making Glasgow a City of Music - Some Ruminations on an UNESCO Award Richard Lloyd, Differentiating Music City - Legacy Industry and Scene in Nashville Volker Kirchberg, Governing Baltimore by Music - Insights from Governance and Governmentality Studies Andreas Gebesmair, Immigrant Music City Vienna? Zur Relevanz ethnischer Kulturökonomien in kreativen Städten Robin Kuchar, Musikproduktion in Hamburg - Musikalische Akteure im Spannungsfeld von Künstlerexistenz und neoliberaler Stadtentwicklung Alexander Grimm, Die Hamburger Schule - Vom Entstehen und Vergehen eines Hamburger Musikclusters Malte Friedrich, Wie klingt die Stadt wenn sie vermarktet wird? Zum Zusammenhang von Musik und Stadtmarketing Sylvia Stiller, Jan Wedemeier, Die Musikwirtschaft in Hamburg - Status Quo und Entwicklungstrends Friedrich Geiger, Gebaute Bürgerlichkeit - Zur Problemgeschichte der Elbphilharmonie
The core of this book is a systematic treatment of the historic transformation of the West from monarchy to democracy. Revisionist in nature, it reaches the conclusion that monarchy is a lesser evil than democracy, but outlines deficiencies in both. Its methodology is axiomatic-deductive, allowing the writer to derive economic and sociological theorems, and then apply them to interpret historical events. A compelling chapter on time preference describes the progress of civilization as lowering time preferences as capital structure is built, and explains how the interaction between people can lower time all around, with interesting parallels to the Ricardian Law of Association. By focusing on this transformation, the author is able to interpret many historical phenomena, such as rising levels of crime, degeneration of standards of conduct and morality, and the growth of the mega-state. In underscoring the deficiencies of both monarchy and democracy, the author demonstrates how these systems are both inferior to a natural order based on private-property. Hoppe deconstructs the classical liberal belief in the possibility of limited government and calls for an alignment of conservatism and libertarianism as natural allies with common goals. He defends the proper role of the production of defense as undertaken by insurance companies on a free market, and describes the emergence of private law among competing insurers. Having established a natural order as superior on utilitarian grounds, the author goes on to assess the prospects for achieving a natural order. Informed by his analysis of the deficiencies of social democracy, and armed with the social theory of legitimation, he forsees secession as the likely future of the US and Europe, resulting in a multitude of region and city-states. This book complements the author's previous work defending the ethics of private property and natural order. Democracy—The God that Failed will be of interest to scholars and students of history, political economy, and political philosophy.
The core of this book is a systematic treatment of the historic transformation of the West from monarchy to democracy. Revisionist in nature, it reaches the conclusion that monarchy is a lesser evil than democracy, but outlines deficiencies in both. Its methodology is axiomatic-deductive, allowing the writer to derive economic and sociological theorems, and then apply them to interpret historical events.

A compelling chapter on time preference describes the progress of civilization as lowering time preferences as capital structure is built, and explains how the interaction between people can lower time all around, with interesting parallels to the Ricardian Law of Association. By focusing on this transformation, the author is able to interpret many historical phenomena, such as rising levels of crime, degeneration of standards of conduct and morality, and the growth of the mega-state. In underscoring the deficiencies of both monarchy and democracy, the author demonstrates how these systems are both inferior to a natural order based on private-property.

Hoppe deconstructs the classical liberal belief in the possibility of limited government and calls for an alignment of conservatism and libertarianism as natural allies with common goals. He defends the proper role of the production of defense as undertaken by insurance companies on a free market, and describes the emergence of private law among competing insurers.

Having established a natural order as superior on utilitarian grounds, the author goes on to assess the prospects for achieving a natural order. Informed by his analysis of the deficiencies of social democracy, and armed with the social theory of legitimation, he forsees secession as the likely future of the US and Europe, resulting in a multitude of region and city-states. This book complements the author's previous work defending the ethics of private property and natural order. Democracy - The God that Failed will be of interest to scholars and students of history, political economy, and political philosophy.

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