Processing of Particulate Solids

Particle Technology Series

Book 9
Springer Science & Business Media
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Over half of the products of the chemical and process industries are sold in a particulate form. The range of such products is vast: from agrochemicals to pigments, from detergents to foods, from plastics to pharmaceuticals. However, surveys of the performance of processes designed to produce particulate products have consistently shown inadequate design and poor reliability.
`Particle technology' is a new subject facing new challenges. Chemical and process engineering is becoming less concerned with the design of plants to produce generic simple chemicals (which are often single phase fluids) and is now more concerned with speciality `effect' chemicals which may often be in particulate form. Chemical and process engineers are also being recruited in increasing numbers into areas outside their tranditional fields, such as the food industry, pharmaceuticals and the manufacture of a wide variety of consumer products. This book has been written to meet their needs. It provides comprehensive coverage of the technology of particulate solids, in a form which is both accessible and concise enough to be useful to engineering and science students in the final year of an undergraduate degree, and at Master's level. Although it was written with students of chemical engineering in mind, it will also be of use and interest to students of other disciplines. It comprises an account of the fundamentals of teh subject, illustrated by worked examples, and followed by a wide range of selected applications.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Springer Science & Business Media
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Published on
Dec 6, 2012
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Pages
372
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ISBN
9789400914599
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Science / Biotechnology
Technology & Engineering / General
Technology & Engineering / Industrial Design / General
Technology & Engineering / Industrial Design / Product
Technology & Engineering / Industrial Engineering
Technology & Engineering / Manufacturing
Technology & Engineering / Materials Science / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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The 21st century business environment demands more analysis and rigor in marketing decision making. Increasingly, marketing decision making resembles design engineering-putting together concepts, data, analyses, and simulations to learn about the marketplace and to design effective marketing plans. While many view traditional marketing as art and some view it as science, the new marketing increasingly looks like engineering (that is, combining art and science to solve specific problems).

Marketing Engineering is the systematic approach to harness data and knowledge to drive effective marketing decision making and implementation through a technology-enabled and model-supported decision process. (For more information on Excel-based models that support these concepts, visit DecisionPro.biz.)

We have designed this book primarily for the business school student or marketing manager, who, with minimal background and technical training, must understand and employ the basic tools and models associated with Marketing Engineering.

We offer an accessible overview of the most widely used marketing engineering concepts and tools and show how they drive the collection of the right data and information to perform the right analyses to make better marketing plans, better product designs, and better marketing decisions.

What's New In the 2nd Edition

While much has changed in the nearly five years since the first edition of Principles of Marketing Engineering was published, much has remained the same. Hence, we have not changed the basic structure or contents of the book. We have, however

Updated the examples and references. Added new content on customer lifetime value and customer valuation methods. Added several new pricing models. Added new material on "reverse perceptual mapping" to describe some exciting enhancements to our Marketing Engineering for Excel software. Provided some new perspectives on the future of Marketing Engineering. Provided better alignment between the content of the text and both the software and cases available with Marketing Engineering for Excel 2.0.
1,1 Applications of Slurry Transport Vast tonnages are pumped every year in the form of solid-liquid mixtures, known as slurries. The application which involves the largest quantities is the dredging industry, continually maintaining navigation in harbours and rivers, altering coastlines and winning material for landfill and construction purposes. As a single dredge may be required to maintain a throughput of 7000 tonnes of slurry per hour or more, very large centrifugal pumps are used. Figures 1-1 and 1-2 show, respectively, an exterior view of this type of pump, and a view of a large dredge-pump impeller (Addie & Helmley, 1989). The manufacture of fertiliser is another process involving massive slur- transport operations. Li Florida, phosphate matrix is recovered by huge draglines in open-pit mining operations. It is then slurried, and pumped to the wash plants through pipelines with a typical length of about 10 kilometres. Each year some 34 million tonnes of matrix are transported in this manner. This industry employs centrifugal pumps that are generally smaller than those used in large dredges, but impeller diameters up to 1. 4 m are common, and drive capacity is often in excess of 1000 kW. The transport distance is typically longer than for dredging applications, and Chapter 1 Figure LI. Testing a dredge pump at the GIW Hydraulic Laboratory Figure 1. 2. Impeller for large dredge pump 1. Introduction 3 hence a series of pumping stations is often used. Figure 1-3 shows a boost- pump installation in a phosphate pipeline.
The aim of this book is to link demand and supply of environmental information in the field of Life Cycle Management. The book is based on the results of the CHAINET concerted action financed by EU-DGXII for the work period 1998-2000, and is intended to build bridges between the different scientific communities in the field of Life Cycle Management. A structured approach is followed, meaning that both demand and supply of environmental information are characterised, after which the two are linked.
Chapter 2 deals with the demand side; a number of characteristics are identified including the object of analysis, different question types, consecutive decision steps, and the cultural context of the decision at hand. Chapter 3 gives an overview of the supply side, distinguishing between concepts, analytical tools, procedural tools, technical elements, and data. The focus of the book is on analytical tools. In Chapter 4 and in a 34-page annex, eleven analytical tools are systematically described, including LCA, MIPS, ERA, MFA, SFA, CERA, IOA, analytical tools for ecodesign, LCC, TCA, and CBA.
In Chapter 5, demand and supply are linked, starting from the question types and indicating which types of tools are particularly suited for which type of question. For instance, it is shown that LCA is particularly useful for operational questions, but less so for more strategic questions. Other aspects concern the distinction between a broad overview and a detailed analysis, and, interestingly, the cultural context of the decision. It appears that without agreement on the criteria to be used, quantitative analytical tools such as LCA, ERA, or CBA may not be very helpful as support for decision-making. Rather more robust quantitative, or even qualitative, tools may then be used instead.
Chapter 6 makes a number of concluding remarks. A plea is made for the combined use of tools, rather than the development of a super tool. Another important topic concerns the customisation of tools, which is seen as quite useful if combined with a periodic validation against a more detailed analysis.
In the text of the preceding chapters, 26 text boxes are included as practical illustrations of the principles described in the text. In the following chapters, three cases are presented, dealing with electronic goods, the car, and clothes washing. These cases show how, in practice, different tools are used in combination, as a support for a given decision situation.
The book is particularly suited for courses in higher education, both for universities and polytechnics, and for use by consultancy firms, by larger companies, and industrial branch organisations.
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