Human Transit: How Clearer Thinking about Public Transit Can Enrich Our Communities and Our Lives

Island Press
4
Free sample

Public transit is a powerful tool for addressing a huge range of urban problems, including traffic congestion and economic development as well as climate change. But while many people support transit in the abstract, it's often hard to channel that support into good transit investments. Part of the problem is that transit debates attract many kinds of experts, who often talk past each other. Ordinary people listen to a little of this and decide that transit is impossible to figure out.

Jarrett Walker believes that transit can be simple, if we focus first on the underlying geometry that all transit technologies share. In Human Transit, Walker supplies the basic tools, the critical questions, and the means to make smarter decisions about designing and implementing transit services.

Human Transit explains the fundamental geometry of transit that shapes successful systems; the process for fitting technology to a particular community; and the local choices that lead to transit-friendly development. Whether you are in the field or simply a concerned citizen, here is an accessible guide to achieving successful public transit that will enrich any community.
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About the author

Jarrett Walker is a transit consultant who has been designing public transportation systems in the United States and abroad for more than twenty years. He is currently a principal consultant at MRCagney.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Island Press
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Published on
Jul 29, 2012
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Pages
235
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ISBN
9781610911740
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Language
English
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Genres
Architecture / Urban & Land Use Planning
Transportation / General
Transportation / Public Transportation
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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