Mobile Tech Report 2014: Technology news from 2013 and predictions and insights about 2014.

Mindwarm Incorporated
98
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If you read technology news, you’ll notice it’s not just a story of amazing new product introductions, or even that plus copycat product introductions.  All the usual aspects of business are there: fierce competition, new contenders, old survivors, great ideas but business failures, mediocre ideas that somehow seem to succeed and prosper.

As a reporter, commentator and blogger on mobile technology, I’ve collected what happened in the industry in 2013 and make predictions on what will and won’t happen in 2014.


You can read what did happen in the mobile technology in 2013.  Often I deliver a comment with the news item and usually there is a link to the web page of the original announcement.  This way you can dive into any detail level you desire, read my news feed for the overview or follow the related web link to the longer article.


History is moving so fast now that it is all recorded electronically, but I’m surprised no one else has collected it and presented it for consideration.  Here is 2013 from the mobile technology industry for your consideration along with my own observations and opinions about where things are headed.


It’s often overlooked that the technology industry is an industry.  By that I mean its main concerns are profit and growth.  As consumers we love the new products and unique abilities we are gaining from technology, but it is a business akin to any other, trying to seduce us to pry money out of our wallets.  So I cover the horse race aspect of the business, who’s up, who’s down.  Is that changing?  Is that likely to change?


The longer implications of what the technology industry is doing are vast and social.  We are moving to an always on, always connected society where we can communicate with someone instantly and find an answer to any question quickly.  The entire database of human knowledge is now available in the palm of your hand whenever you desire it.  Everything is there, the good, the bad, right and wrong, hate and love, music and noise.  We are obsessed with technology, not in and of itself, but as a means to an end.  Technology is the means to satisfy our curiosity or even our desire for self-expression.  We are taking photos machine gun-style with our smartphones and choose the few to share.  As humans we are gathering ever more data about ourselves and sharing more about ourselves than we probably thought possible.


Bill Gates was once asked why the computer industry had generated so much improvement in its products over a relatively few years.  He gave some boring answer about Moore’s Law, but the real answer is that computers are in their teenage years.  They are growing and growing.  They will not always do so.  So too the technology industry is in a state of rapid change.  I see the shift to smaller devices as a new paradigm, smashing some businesses and growing others into giants.  Their stories are here in the news.


In short here are predictions for what won’t and will happen in 2014 for the mobile technology industry, breakdowns of marketshare figures on the horse race aspect of the business, chapters on Apple, Samsung, Google, Microsoft, Nokia, Blackberry, Amazon, Yahoo, news about social media giants Facebook, Twitter, Google+, LinkedIn, Foursquare, SnapChat and the carriers themselves Verizon, AT&T, Sprint andT-Mobile.  You can also review my 2013 mobile predictions and see my track record on predictions.


Finally there are some essays on how all this mobile tech is figuring into our lives.


I’ve divided the news into the subjects it covers, but also put in the appendix all the news as it came out in chronological ordering.  You can read the firehose of events in the appendix, or just read about one topic at a time in the earlier chapters.




Table of Contents



Preface


Introduction


Chapter 1: 2014 Predictions


Chapter 2: Mobile Marketshare


Chapter 3: Apple


Chapter 4: Samsung


Chapter 5: Google


Chapter 6: Microsoft


Chapter 7: Nokia


Chapter 8: Blackberry


Chapter 9: Amazon


Chapter 10: Social Media


Chapter 11: Yahoo


Chapter 12: Carriers


Chapter 13: 2013 Predictions


Chapter 14: Essays


Appendix

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About the author

Mobile technology is huge in our lives today.  You’re probably carrying a smartphone, going to work with a desktop or laptop during the day and web surfing on your couch with a tablet.  We’ve moved into a constantly connected, always on, continuously communicating lifestyle.  This would not be possible without technology and the tech industry has been going through a big upheaval with the migration to ever more mobile devices.

It all started in 2007 with the introduction of the Apple iPhone, but like most tech products, it was really an evolution based on all that came before it.  I can say this because I’ve worked in the technology industry for 30 years and have watched the incredible rise of microelectronic devices in our lives.

In June 2010 I began reporting the tech news I read into my @pdxmobile Twitter account, so named because I live in Portland, Oregon (PDX is the local airport designation) and mobile is where all the technology action is nowadays.  I worked in the tech industry because I was an enthusiast for the products.  As an engineer I helped design some or helped on equipment used to build others.  I feel this gives me insight into how things get put together before they’re made available to the public.

I gather most of my news online now, or at in-person meetings that the tech community love such as Lunch 2.0, CHIFOO (Computer Human Interface Forum of Oregon), Barcamp, Ignite Portland, PDX Breakfast, WebVisions, Dorkbot, Open Source Bridge, Android User Group, PDX Cocoaheads, InnoTech, Drupalcon, Chirp, Beer and Blog, PADNUG and other meetups.  It’s a big wild tech world out there and I enjoy being part of it as an engineer, a consumer of tech goodies, a visionary on my blog at pdxmobile.com and just a watcher of all things technological.  

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Additional Information

Publisher
Mindwarm Incorporated
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Published on
Jan 10, 2014
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Pages
1077
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ISBN
9780991049912
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Corporate & Business History
Business & Economics / E-Commerce / General
Business & Economics / General
Business & Economics / Industries / Computers & Information Technology
Business & Economics / Information Management
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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"Straight Talk for Startups memorializes age-old best practices and empowers both experienced and new investment professionals to beat the odds."—David Krane, CEO, Google Ventures

"Straight Talk for Startups is filled with real, raw, and fact-based ‘rules of the road’ that you need to know when diving into our ultra-competitive startup world. A must read and a re-read!"—Tony Fadell, Coinventor of the iPod/iPhone & Founder of Nest Labs

Veteran venture capitalist Randy Komisar and finance executive Jantoon Reigersman share no-nonsense, counterintuitive guidelines to help anyone build a successful startup.

Over the course of their careers, Randy Komisar and Jantoon Reigersman continue to see startups crash and burn because they forget the timeless lessons of entrepreneurship.

But, as Komisar and Reigersman show, you can beat the odds if you quickly learn what insiders know about what it takes to build a healthy foundation for a thriving venture. In Straight Talk for Startups they walk budding entrepreneurs through 100 essential rules—from pitching your idea to selecting investors to managing your board to deciding how and when to achieve liquidity. Culled from their own decades of experience, as well as the experiences of their many successful colleagues and friends, the rules are organized under broad topics, from "Mastering the Fundamentals" and "Selecting the Right Investors," to "The Ideal Fundraise," "Building and Managing Effective Boards," and "Achieving Liquidity."

Vital rules you’ll find in Straight Talk for Startups include:

The best ideas originate from founders who are usersCreate two business plans: an execution plan and an aspirational planNet income is an option, but cash flow is a factDon’t accept money from strangersPersonal wealth doesn’t equal good investingSmall boards are better than big onesAdd independent board members for expertise and objectivityToo many unanimous board decisions are a sign of troubleChoose an acquirer, don’t wait to be chosenLearn the rules by heart so you know when to break them

Filled with helpful real-life examples and specific, actionable advice, Straight Talk for Startups is the ideal handbook for anyone running, working for, or thinking about creating a startup, or just curious about what makes high-potential ventures tick.

From small-town Kansas boy to adventure-junkie extraordinaire to respected mountaineer, this funky and funny read traces Skip Yowell's (Co-Founder of JanSport) unorthodox journey to the top of the outdoor industry.

Full of offbeat details and photos from Skip's adventures around the world, he lets it all hang out as he offers you a rare behind-the-scenes look at the three hippies who built a successful company during the Summer of Love . . . how their good vibrations continue to change an entire industry . . . and why breaking the rules and taking good care of their customers keeps JanSport at the top of their game.

No question, Skip's story will take you higher. He'll show you the ropes for whatever mountain you face. Whether he's drinking "Commie beer" in Ohio or slurping yak butter tea in China, this book will get under your skin and into your heart. And who knows, his story might just kick-start your dreams.

So go ahead. Get the book (and another for your friend). Find a chair or couch or park or plane. Get comfortable. Be inspired. Then go climb your own mountain.

"Skip's account of the founding of JanSport wreaks of honesty, humor, and enough anecdotes to stir a memory in almost anyone who has spent time outside. His tale takes you from a small room above a transmission shop to a global enterprise and packs enough adventures to keep the fire stoked and the beer on ice for hours." ?Larry Burke, Editor-in-Chief, Outside Magazine

"This amazing book chronicles the life of Skip Yowell, a man who climbed the corporate ladder not in a suit and tie, but in hiking boots and with a backpack. He did so in style, and had tons of fun doing it. He stayed true to himself, maintained friendships, traveled the world and most importantly, preserved his passion for his job.... We can all learn something from Skip, who started building backpacks from scratch and created a company that is now a giant in the industry. His honesty and passion for life are his priority, which all of his friends and business associates can attest to. The world would be a better place with more people like Skip Yowell. I am proud to have him as my friend and encourage you to get to know his story! You will be inspired." ?Ed Viesturs, First American to climb all fourteen 8,000 meter peaks, Author of No Shortcuts to the Top

"I wish this enlightening book had been available 30 years ago. The inspiration I have derived from it now would have been welcomed then. Like a new band without a 'label' (either style or record company), with originality and dedication it shows how JanSport forged their own way and set the high marks for others to strive for. This 'how it was done' book should be read by all aspiring musicians, for the principles of success are universal and are defined within." ?John McEuen, Founding Member of the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band

 If you read technology news, you’ll notice it’s not just a story of amazing new product introductions, or even that plus copycat product introductions.  All the usual aspects of business are there: fierce competition, new contenders, old survivors, great ideas but business failures, mediocre ideas that somehow seem to succeed and prosper.

As a reporter, commentator and blogger on mobile technology, I’ve collected what happened in the industry in 2015 and make predictions on what will and won’t happen in 2016.

You can read what did happen in the mobile technology in 2015.  Often I deliver a comment with the news item and usually there is a link to the web page of the original announcement.  This way you can dive into any detail level you desire, read my news feed for the overview or follow the related web link to the longer article.

History is moving so fast now that it is all recorded electronically, but I’m surprised no one else has collected it and presented it for consideration.  Here is 2015 from the mobile technology industry for your consideration along with my own observations and opinions about where things are headed.

It’s often overlooked that the technology industry is an industry.  By that I mean its main concerns are profit and growth.  As consumers we love the new products and unique abilities we are gaining from technology, but it is a business akin to any other, trying to seduce us to pry money out of our wallets.  So I cover the horse race aspect of the business, who’s up, who’s down.  Is that changing?  Is that likely to change?

The longer implications of what the technology industry is doing are vast and social.  We are moving to an always on, always connected society where we can communicate with someone instantly and find an answer to any question quickly.  The entire database of human knowledge is now available in the palm of your hand whenever you desire it.  Everything is there, the good, the bad, right and wrong, hate and love, music and noise.  We are obsessed with technology, not in and of itself, but as a means to an end.  Technology is the means to satisfy our curiosity or even our desire for self-expression.  We are taking photos machine gun-style with our smartphones and choose the few to share.  As humans we are gathering ever more data about ourselves and sharing more about ourselves than we probably thought possible.

Bill Gates was once asked why the computer industry had generated so much improvement in its products over a relatively few years.  He gave some boring answer about Moore’s Law, but the real answer is that computers are in their teenage years.  They are growing and growing.  They will not always do so.  So too the technology industry is in a state of rapid change.  I see the shift to smaller devices as a new paradigm, smashing some businesses and growing others into giants.  Their stories are here in the news.

In short here are predictions for what won’t and will happen in 2016 for the mobile technology industry, breakdowns of marketshare figures on the horse race aspect of the business, chapters on Apple, Samsung, Google, Microsoft, Nokia, Blackberry, Amazon, Yahoo, news about social media giants Facebook, Twitter, Google+, LinkedIn, Foursquare, SnapChat and the carriers themselves Verizon, AT&T, Sprint andT-Mobile.  You can also review my 2015 mobile predictions and see my track record on predictions.

Finally there are some essays on how all this mobile tech is figuring into our lives.

I’ve divided the news into the subjects it covers, but also put in the appendix all the news as it came out in chronological ordering.  You can read the firehose of events in the appendix, or just read about one topic at a time in the earlier chapters.

NATIONAL BESTSELLER

Developing video games—hero's journey or fool's errand? The creative and technical logistics that go into building today's hottest games can be more harrowing and complex than the games themselves, often seeming like an endless maze or a bottomless abyss. In Blood, Sweat, and Pixels, Jason Schreier takes readers on a fascinating odyssey behind the scenes of video game development, where the creator may be a team of 600 overworked underdogs or a solitary geek genius. Exploring the artistic challenges, technical impossibilities, marketplace demands, and Donkey Kong-sized monkey wrenches thrown into the works by corporate, Blood, Sweat, and Pixels reveals how bringing any game to completion is more than Sisyphean—it's nothing short of miraculous.

Taking some of the most popular, bestselling recent games, Schreier immerses readers in the hellfire of the development process, whether it's RPG studio Bioware's challenge to beat an impossible schedule and overcome countless technical nightmares to build Dragon Age: Inquisition; indie developer Eric Barone's single-handed efforts to grow country-life RPG Stardew Valley from one man's vision into a multi-million-dollar franchise; or Bungie spinning out from their corporate overlords at Microsoft to create Destiny, a brand new universe that they hoped would become as iconic as Star Wars and Lord of the Rings—even as it nearly ripped their studio apart.

Documenting the round-the-clock crunches, buggy-eyed burnout, and last-minute saves, Blood, Sweat, and Pixels is a journey through development hell—and ultimately a tribute to the dedicated diehards and unsung heroes who scale mountains of obstacles in their quests to create the best games imaginable.

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER. The unbelievable true story of the man who built a billion-dollar online drug empire from his bedroom—and almost got away with it
 
In 2011, a twenty-six-year-old libertarian programmer named Ross Ulbricht launched the ultimate free market: the Silk Road, a clandestine Web site hosted on the Dark Web where anyone could trade anything—drugs, hacking software, forged passports, counterfeit cash, poisons—free of the government’s watchful eye.
 
It wasn’t long before the media got wind of the new Web site where anyone—not just teenagers and weed dealers but terrorists and black hat hackers—could buy and sell contraband detection-free. Spurred by a public outcry, the federal government launched an epic two-year manhunt for the site’s elusive proprietor, with no leads, no witnesses, and no clear jurisdiction. All the investigators knew was that whoever was running the site called himself the Dread Pirate Roberts.
 
The Silk Road quickly ballooned into $1.2 billion enterprise, and Ross embraced his new role as kingpin. He enlisted a loyal crew of allies in high and low places, all as addicted to the danger and thrill of running an illegal marketplace as their customers were to the heroin they sold. Through his network he got wind of the target on his back and took drastic steps to protect himself—including ordering a hit on a former employee. As Ross made plans to disappear forever, the Feds raced against the clock to catch a man they weren’t sure even existed, searching for a needle in the haystack of the global Internet.

Drawing on exclusive access to key players and two billion digital words and images Ross left behind, Vanity Fair correspondent and New York Times bestselling author Nick Bilton offers a tale filled with twists and turns, lucky breaks and unbelievable close calls. It’s a story of the boy next door’s ambition gone criminal, spurred on by the clash between the new world of libertarian-leaning, anonymous, decentralized Web advocates and the old world of government control, order, and the rule of law. Filled with unforgettable characters and capped by an astonishing climax, American Kingpin might be dismissed as too outrageous for fiction. But it’s all too real.
 Twitter wisdom can be hard to find.  

The 140 character limit of an utterance imposes a brevity that makes the tweeter get right to the point.  Living within this harsh constraint you'll find SwamiRoberts or @swamiroberts on Twitter.  The Swami began tweeting in 2010 when something became important enough to comment about.


While the Swami offers up opinions on many topics, most can be classified into the categories: Work, Wise, Love, Cash, Soul, Joke, Tech, Twitter and Food.  These are the chapters of the book with insights onto each.


Language is a fascination of the Swami.  Recently the phrase "throwing sheep" came to mean offering up a pointless or senseless comment.  The Swami strives to avoid throwing sheep, but on occasion will refrain from seriousness.  Often there is a serious side to the Swami and a truth inside the funny comment.  The Love and Soul chapters are more serious than the other sections, although fans of Dilbert or Office Space will find the truths in the Work chapter familiar.


The world around us is the inspiration for the Swami.  Here in Portland, Oregon food carts have exploded all over town.  I just don't recall seeing very many before 2009, but now they are everywhere.  One such food cart sold mini (small) sandwiches.  Eating one such sandwich inspired the Swami tweet:  "When you are very hungry eat a mini-sandwich and you will only be hungry."


2012 was the year that the ancient Mayans predicted as the end of the world, or at least some kind of apocalypse happening.  In the chapter Wise there are eleven apocalypse survival tips the Swami gives you.  My favorite is tip number one: "Do not warn others about the coming apocalypse."


In the past it was only the court jester that could speak the truth safely to the king.  Of course even the jester had to be cautious and was careful to conceal his insight with humor.  Take the Swami in the same vein.  There be truth in these tweets.


twisdom has an entire chapter on Twitter and while it's not exactly a course in manners, there are dos and don'ts -- not just for Twitter, but also for Facebook, LinkedIn, FourSquare, Google+ and any other social network.  The Swami also has some thoughts on the differences between these social networks.


There are a few quotes in this book.  Paul Bingman was a close personal friend who died in 2011.  I really wish he was here to read this book, although he did read the Swami's tweets and had fun feedback.  Paul's quote is "All you really have is your time and your attention."  That was the philosophy of at least his later years, where Paul always strove to help others and do the good he could while also having some fun.


You might take the Swami in small doses.  You might gorge your eyes and mind with a long good read.  I find myself reading the Swami when I'm feeling lost or down and the Swami always picks me up a bit.  Here's hoping the Swami lifts you to a higher self too.

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