Navigating the Labyrinth: An Executive Guide to Data Management

Technics Publications
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If you are leading an organization or if you need to communicate with leaders about data management, Navigating the Labyrinth is your guide.

Organizations that want to get value from their data need to manage that data well. But to most executives, data management seems obscure, complicated, and highly technical. You don’t have time to learn all the detail or cut through the hype. Navigating the Labyrinth helps you get there. Based on best practices from DAMA’s Data Management Body of Knowledge (DMBOK2), it explains the fundamentals and says why they are important. It focuses your attention on what you need to know to help your organization build trust in and get value out of its data. 

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About the author

About DAMA

DAMA International is a not-for-profit, vendor-independent association of technical and business professionals dedicated to advancing concepts and practices related to managing data and information in support of business strategy. With chapters throughout the world, DAMA International encourages best practices through a network of connected individuals and organizations who share ideas, trends, problems, and solutions and who look to DAMA as the trusted, collaborative central resource for all things data. Visit dama.org to learn more.

About Laura

Laura Sebastian-Coleman has worked on data quality in large health care analytic data warehouses since 2003. She has implemented data quality metrics and reporting, launched and facilitated data quality working groups, and developed data consumer training programs. She has contributed to efforts to establish data standards and to manage metadata for large analytic data warehouses and big data environments. Named DAMA Publications Officer in 2015, she was production editor for the DMBOK2, for which she received DAMA International's prestigious annual award for Outstanding Service to the Data Management Profession in 2018. She is also author of Measuring Data Quality for Ongoing Improvement.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Technics Publications
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Pages
208
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ISBN
9781634623773
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Industries / Computers & Information Technology
Business & Economics / Information Management
Computers / Management Information Systems
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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By one estimate, 90 percent of all of the data in history was created in the last two years. In 2014, International Data Corporation calculated the data universe at 4.4 zettabytes, or 4.4 trillion gigabytes. That much information, in volume, could fill enough slender iPad Air tablets to create a stack two-thirds of the way to the moon. Now, that's Big Data.

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The age of data-ism is here. But are we ready to handle its consequences, good and bad?

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This book walks through the five steps of the PDM process:
conducting a high-level strategic review of what an organization does, who it serves, what it wants to do, and how it is going to do it;instituting performance measures to gauge success for the organization;completing comprehensive business cases for projects and using them to mitigate risk and manage projects throughout the project life cycle;performing benefits realization on completed projects; and establishing these best practices to achieve successful results in the future.

This is an essential tool for all IT and business managers in government and contractors doing business with the government, and it has much useful and actionable information for anyone who is interested in helping their business save money and take on effective, successful practices.
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In this book, a team of IBM’s leading information management experts guide you on a journey that will take you from where you are today toward becoming an “Intelligent Enterprise.”

Drawing on their extensive experience working with enterprise clients, the authors present a new, information-centric approach to architecture and powerful new models that will benefit any organization. Using these strategies and models, companies can systematically unlock the business value of information by delivering actionable, real-time information in context to enable better decision-making throughout the enterprise–from the “shop floor” to the “top floor.”

Coverage Includes

Highlighting the importance of Dynamic Warehousing Defining your Enterprise Information Architecture from conceptual, logical, component, and operational views Using information architecture principles to integrate and rationalize your IT investments, from Cloud Computing to Information Service Lifecycle Management Applying enterprise Master Data Management (MDM) to bolster business functions, ranging from compliance and risk management to marketing and product management Implementing more effective business intelligence and business performance optimization, governance, and security systems and processes Understanding “Information as a Service” and “Info 2.0,” the information delivery side of Web 2.0
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NATIONAL BESTSELLER

Developing video games—hero's journey or fool's errand? The creative and technical logistics that go into building today's hottest games can be more harrowing and complex than the games themselves, often seeming like an endless maze or a bottomless abyss. In Blood, Sweat, and Pixels, Jason Schreier takes readers on a fascinating odyssey behind the scenes of video game development, where the creator may be a team of 600 overworked underdogs or a solitary geek genius. Exploring the artistic challenges, technical impossibilities, marketplace demands, and Donkey Kong-sized monkey wrenches thrown into the works by corporate, Blood, Sweat, and Pixels reveals how bringing any game to completion is more than Sisyphean—it's nothing short of miraculous.

Taking some of the most popular, bestselling recent games, Schreier immerses readers in the hellfire of the development process, whether it's RPG studio Bioware's challenge to beat an impossible schedule and overcome countless technical nightmares to build Dragon Age: Inquisition; indie developer Eric Barone's single-handed efforts to grow country-life RPG Stardew Valley from one man's vision into a multi-million-dollar franchise; or Bungie spinning out from their corporate overlords at Microsoft to create Destiny, a brand new universe that they hoped would become as iconic as Star Wars and Lord of the Rings—even as it nearly ripped their studio apart.

Documenting the round-the-clock crunches, buggy-eyed burnout, and last-minute saves, Blood, Sweat, and Pixels is a journey through development hell—and ultimately a tribute to the dedicated diehards and unsung heroes who scale mountains of obstacles in their quests to create the best games imaginable.

A FINANCIAL TIMES BOOK OF THE MONTH

FROM THE WALL STREET JOURNAL: "Nothing Mr. Gilder says or writes is ever delivered at anything less than the fullest philosophical decibel... Mr. Gilder sounds less like a tech guru than a poet, and his words tumble out in a romantic cascade."

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Silicon Valley, long dominated by a few giants, faces a “great unbundling,” which will disperse computer power and commerce and transform the economy and the Internet.

Life after Google is almost here.



For fans of "Wealth and Poverty," "Knowledge and Power," and "The Scandal of Money."
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