So You Wish To Learn All About Economics?: A Text on Elementary Mathematical Economics

Executive Intelligence Review
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    Down with Adam Smith! Away with the foolish professors who claim economics is "the dismal science," chained to a calculus of "scarce resources"! The only economics worth knowing is the science of increasing mankind's power over nature at increasing rates, in accordance with natural law as expressed in the Book of Genesis.
      LaRouche puts economics back where it belongs, so that every citizen can master for himself the fundamental principles that made the United States an industrial and agricultural superpower--from the advanced standpoint required to run a 21st-century fusion-power economy.
The present "Second Great Depression" is completely unnecessary. There is no need for the 1931-style financial collapse that faces the Trans-Atlantic region today.
The rapidly developing nations of the world are using the ideas in this book to create, spread and share a prosperous future. Should the United States decide to join them in applying the ideas in this book, the future of civilization will be of unlimited potential.
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About the author

   The author, chief executive for an international specialist newsweekly, the Executive Intelligence Review, has been the most accurate economic forecaster in history.

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Publisher
Executive Intelligence Review
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Published on
Sep 2, 2015
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Pages
192
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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      In 1984 Lyndon LaRouche wrote a widely circulated economics textbook, called So, You Wish To Learn All About Economics?  Most Americans didn’t.

     However, across the “developing world," especially in China, leaders eager to overcome backwardness sought out answers to questions such as:  “How did America become a powerful, productive force in the world?”  “How can we apply LaRouche’s ideas to overcome our own problems and secure a better future for our people?”

     Many of the answers are found in this book, first published in 2000.  Much of it was written in response to questions or requests from the “developing world.”  The biggest question which this book answered was “How can we get around the strangulation of International Monetary Fund (IMF) conditionalities so we can actually begin to build up our nations?”

     After a long detour down the suicidal path of “post-industrial society,” Americans too face almost the same problem today as did the “developing countries” before they adopted LaRouche’s ideas for Hamiltonian banking on a global scale to bypass the IMF.  Will America finally give up subservience to Wall Street and London imperial banking and join with the New Paradigm of LaRouche’s Hamiltonian World Land-Bridge development banks?

     The answer to that question is in this book and in your decision to take some responsibility to ensure that America returns to its Hamiltonian roots.

     The author is the founder and contributing editor of Executive Intelligence Review magazine, whose forecasts for the US. economy have been the most accurate in the history of economics.

From the Author’s Foreword, 1987

     During the course of the past nearly twenty years, I have become perhaps the most controversial among the influential international figures of this decade. 

     Unlike all of the other leading candidates for the U.S. presidency since 1945, I am an influential original thinker. This is not to suggest that such prospective candidates as Vice President George Bush and Senator Robert Dole are lacking in intelligence or executive abilities. For the past forty years, the successful candidates for the presidency have been persons who, in the customary manner of speaking, advanced their political career up to that point, by doing “the right thing at the right time,” saying and doing nothing which will make enemies among important factions of the “establishment.” Bush and Dole, for example have adapted to those rules for success under ordinary conditions. 

     However, this is a crisis; in such crises, what is customarily successful becomes a failure. Our nation has once again entered into a time when only the unusual succeeds, and the usual fails. We have entered into a period of crisis in which only original thinkers are qualified to lead. 

     On paper, our nation is a constitutional democratic republic. In reality, it has not been such a republic for approximately one hundred years, certainly not since the sweeping changes in our form of government introduced during the presidency of Theodore Roosevelt. Most of the time, the policies of government, the selection of most leading candidates for federal office, and the majority of popular opinion, have been regulated by behind-the-scenes committees representing what is called “the establishment.” 

     Under this arrangement, candidates for leading office present themselves, like job applicants for corporate executive appointments, to this “establishment.” The “establishment” either gives such candidates permission to campaign, or “not at this time.” If given such permission, the candidate so “authorized” seeks backing for his or her election by the “establishment,” by proving to the “establishment” that he or she can “sell” the policy which the establishment has decided to push at that time. 

     ... I began to understand this in 1947. ... I wished General Dwight Eisenhower to campaign for the 1948 Democratic nomination. The general replied to me, stating agreement with my policy arguments in support of his candidacy, but informing me his candidacy was not appropriate at that time. There is no doubt that Eisenhower could have won the 1948 nomination and election by a landslide, had the “establishment” permitted him to campaign. …

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From the Author’s Foreword, 1987

     During the course of the past nearly twenty years, I have become perhaps the most controversial among the influential international figures of this decade. 

     Unlike all of the other leading candidates for the U.S. presidency since 1945, I am an influential original thinker. This is not to suggest that such prospective candidates as Vice President George Bush and Senator Robert Dole are lacking in intelligence or executive abilities. For the past forty years, the successful candidates for the presidency have been persons who, in the customary manner of speaking, advanced their political career up to that point, by doing “the right thing at the right time,” saying and doing nothing which will make enemies among important factions of the “establishment.” Bush and Dole, for example have adapted to those rules for success under ordinary conditions. 

     However, this is a crisis; in such crises, what is customarily successful becomes a failure. Our nation has once again entered into a time when only the unusual succeeds, and the usual fails. We have entered into a period of crisis in which only original thinkers are qualified to lead. 

     On paper, our nation is a constitutional democratic republic. In reality, it has not been such a republic for approximately one hundred years, certainly not since the sweeping changes in our form of government introduced during the presidency of Theodore Roosevelt. Most of the time, the policies of government, the selection of most leading candidates for federal office, and the majority of popular opinion, have been regulated by behind-the-scenes committees representing what is called “the establishment.” 

     Under this arrangement, candidates for leading office present themselves, like job applicants for corporate executive appointments, to this “establishment.” The “establishment” either gives such candidates permission to campaign, or “not at this time.” If given such permission, the candidate so “authorized” seeks backing for his or her election by the “establishment,” by proving to the “establishment” that he or she can “sell” the policy which the establishment has decided to push at that time. 

     ... I began to understand this in 1947. ... I wished General Dwight Eisenhower to campaign for the 1948 Democratic nomination. The general replied to me, stating agreement with my policy arguments in support of his candidacy, but informing me his candidacy was not appropriate at that time. There is no doubt that Eisenhower could have won the 1948 nomination and election by a landslide, had the “establishment” permitted him to campaign. …

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