Enduring Bonds: The Significance of Interpersonal Relationships in Young Children's Lives

Springer Science & Business Media
Free sample

Mary Renck Jalongo Interpersonal relationships present an interesting paradox to the young child. Although human bonds are a source of love, security and joy, they are, at the same time, the context in which children feel intense and complicated emotions such as jealousy, shame, resentment, sorrow, and rage. To illustrate, consider a series of incidents in the life of a young child named Melissa. All of these events were so memorable that they became oft-repeated family stories. At age 4, after Melissa was reprimanded by her mother, she packed a small plastic suitcase and announced that she was running away. Her mother kept a watchful eye while the preschooler stood at the end of the driveway for several moments. The child’s sister—eight years her senior—decided to go out and gently inquire about her younger sibling’s plans, to which Melissa responded ruefully, “I can’t run away. I remembered that I’m not allowed to cross the street by myself. ” Months later, Melissa enters kindergarten and she arrives home at the end of her school day, obviously upset. When asked about it, she says, “One of the kids told me I was doing my work wrong and it ruined my whole day. ” In first grade, Melissa has experience with one of the school child’s greatest fears: a mean teacher.
Read more

About the author

Mary Renck Jalongo is a teacher, writer and editor. As a classroom teacher, she taught preschool, first grade and second grade, worked with children and families of migrant farm workers, and taught in the laboratory preschool at the University of Toledo. Currently she is a professor at Indiana University of Pennsylvania where she earned the university-wide award for outstanding teaching and is the Coordinator of the Doctoral Program in Curriculum and Instruction. As a writer, Dr. Jalongo has authored and edited more than 25 books, many of them textbooks in the field of early childhood education, such as Early Childhood Language Arts (4th ed. Allyn & Bacon) and Creative Thinking and Arts-Based Learning (4th ed. Merrill/Prentice Hall), Exploring Your Role: An Introduction to Early Childhood Education (3rd ed., Merrill/Prentice Hall) and Major Trends and Issues in Early Childhood Education: Challenges, Controversies, and Insights (2nd ed. Teachers College Press). Recent publications include the second edition of a book for the National Association for the Education of Young Children, Young Children and Picture Books; a Teachers College Press book, Planning for Learning: Collaborative Approaches to Lesson Design and Review; and an edited book for the Association for Childhood Education International, The World’s Children and Their Companion Animals: Developmental and Educational Significance of the Child/Pet Bond. Additionally, she has earned three national awards for excellence in writing and numerous teaching awards. Dr. Jalongo has been the editor-in-chief of the Springer international publication, Early Childhood Education Journal, for twelve years.

Read more
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Springer Science & Business Media
Read more
Published on
Nov 24, 2007
Read more
Pages
213
Read more
ISBN
9780387745251
Read more
Language
English
Read more
Genres
Education / Early Childhood (incl. Preschool & Kindergarten)
Education / Evaluation & Assessment
Education / General
Education / Philosophy, Theory & Social Aspects
Education / Professional Development
Education / Testing & Measurement
Education / Training & Certification
Read more
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
Making Meaning: Constructing Multimodal Perspectives of Language, Literacy, and Learning through Arts-based Early Childhood Education, is a synthesis of theory, research, and practice that explicitly presents art as a meaning making process.

Respected educational theorists from John Dewey to Elliot Eisner argue for a cognitive view of art as creation of meaning. Numerous researchers from a variety of fields promote multimodal views of language, literacy, and learning. Further, while not all practitioners have the background that encourages this multimodal conceptualization, most acknowledge that the arts have a place in the early childhood curriculum, and many express concerns that mandated prescriptive practices and high-stakes test preparation leave little time for arts experiences that were once central to the early childhood curriculum. The multimodal, child-centered understandings of art as a means of "coming to know" presented in this text offer significant implications for young children’s language, literacy and learning and underscore the early childhood education professional’s responsibility to advance the arts in the various settings in which they work.

Therefore, the purpose of this book is to provoke readers to examine their current understandings of language, literacy and learning through the lens of the various arts-based perspectives offered in this volume; to provide them with a starting point for constructing broader, multimodal views of what it might mean to "make meaning;" and to underscore why understanding arts-based learning as a meaning-making process is especially critical to early childhood education in the face of narrowly-focused, test-driven curricular reforms. To that end, a group of distinguished authors will provide chapters that integrate theory and research with stories of how passionate teachers, teacher-educators, and pre-service teachers, along with administrators, artists, and professionals from a variety of fields have transcended disciplinary boundaries to engage the arts as a meaning-making process for young children and for themselves.

How do other countries create “smarter” kids? What is it like to be a child in the world’s new education superpowers? The Smartest Kids in the World “gets well beneath the glossy surfaces of these foreign cultures and manages to make our own culture look newly strange....The question is whether the startling perspective provided by this masterly book can also generate the will to make changes” (The New York Times Book Review).

In a handful of nations, virtually all children are learning to make complex arguments and solve problems they’ve never seen before. They are learning to think, in other words, and to thrive in the modern economy. Inspired to find answers for our own children, author and Time magazine journalist Amanda Ripley follows three Americans embed­ded in these countries for one year. Kim, fifteen, raises $10,000 so she can move from Oklahoma to Finland; Eric, eighteen, trades his high-achieving Minnesota suburb for a booming city in South Korea; and Tom, seventeen, leaves a historic Pennsylvania village for Poland.

Through these young informants, Ripley meets battle-scarred reformers, sleep-deprived zombie students, and a teacher who earns $4 million a year. Their stories, along with groundbreaking research into learning in other cultures, reveal a pattern of startling transformation: none of these countries had many “smart” kids a few decades ago. Things had changed. Teaching had become more rigorous; parents had focused on things that mattered; and children had bought into the promise of education.
This book brings together authoritative information about the child/dog bond as it is manifested with family dogs, visiting therapy dogs, and service dogs trained to assist children with disabilities. Despite the widely accepted view that participating in a dog’s care and interacting with dogs in behaviorally healthy ways is a route to becoming responsible and compassionate, research on this complex dynamic is difficult to design, time-consuming to collect, and challenging to analyze. This volume synthesizes theory, research, and practice, bringing all to bear upon child/dog interactions in homes, schools, libraries, and the community at large. Children, Dogs and Education serves as a handbook for a diverse group of adults who seek to build positive relationships between children and dogs—parents/families, professional dog trainers, teachers, librarians, mental health professionals, health care professionals, and university faculty. The study of interactions between human and nonhuman animals has captured the imagination of an international community of researchers from many different fields and professions. Even though dogs are ubiquitous in the lives of most children, studies of children’s interactions with dogs in families and communities are lacking. Most of the previous research on the human-canine bond has focused on adolescents and adults or, even when younger children are the focus, it has tended to rely on parents to speak for children. There are three features of this book that make it unique. First, it goes beyond exploring the child/dog bond to examine additional important issues, including: children’s concepts of responsible care, their ability to interpret dogs’ behavioral cues, and their ideas about canine behavioral issues/training. Second, unlike most other work to date, it represents children’s voices through cases, interviews, and drawings. Finally, the contributors to this edited work use their collective wisdom to draw educational implications and suggest direction in preparing the next generation of dog guardians.

This book brings together authoritative information about the child/dog bond as it is manifested with family dogs, visiting therapy dogs, and service dogs trained to assist children with disabilities. Despite the widely accepted view that participating in a dog’s care and interacting with dogs in behaviorally healthy ways is a route to becoming responsible and compassionate, research on this complex dynamic is difficult to design, time-consuming to collect, and challenging to analyze. This volume synthesizes theory, research, and practice, bringing all to bear upon child/dog interactions in homes, schools, libraries, and the community at large. Children, Dogs and Education serves as a handbook for a diverse group of adults who seek to build positive relationships between children and dogs—parents/families, professional dog trainers, teachers, librarians, mental health professionals, health care professionals, and university faculty. The study of interactions between human and nonhuman animals has captured the imagination of an international community of researchers from many different fields and professions. Even though dogs are ubiquitous in the lives of most children, studies of children’s interactions with dogs in families and communities are lacking. Most of the previous research on the human-canine bond has focused on adolescents and adults or, even when younger children are the focus, it has tended to rely on parents to speak for children. There are three features of this book that make it unique. First, it goes beyond exploring the child/dog bond to examine additional important issues, including: children’s concepts of responsible care, their ability to interpret dogs’ behavioral cues, and their ideas about canine behavioral issues/training. Second, unlike most other work to date, it represents children’s voices through cases, interviews, and drawings. Finally, the contributors to this edited work use their collective wisdom to draw educational implications and suggest direction in preparing the next generation of dog guardians.

Note: This is the bound book only and does not include access to the Enhanced Pearson eText. To order the Enhanced Pearson eText packaged with a bound book, use ISBN 0134290062 .

How to integrate creativity, play, and the arts into the early childhood curriculum while stimulating learning, meeting current accountability standards, incorporating technology, and differentiating instruction to adapt for the diverse learners in today’s classrooms


With an emphasis on thinking creatively and being resourceful as keys to surviving and thriving in today’s society, this evidence-based book provides practical ways for teachers to promote creativity, play, art, music/movement/dance, and drama for all children. It contains many authentic activities and examples to support children’s learning in the arts and content areas. The book examines the teacher’s role from a philosophical, pedagogical, and curricular stance by addressing key components, including the classroom environment, materials and resources, child guidance, assessment, technology applications, and culturally responsive teaching.


Practical, readable, and illustrative features and discussions include Snapshots of Classrooms, Teachers’ Reflections, Frequently Asked Questions, Meeting Standards guidelines, Differentiating Instruction and Making Adaptations for Diverse Learners, and Integrating the Curriculum. Also included in 7th edition are samples of children's work, how to how to use cooking as a creative activity, and using nature as a critical learning tool. The Enhanced Pearson eText version features new videos, Check Your Understanding quizzes, and Chapter quizzes.

Improve mastery and retention with the Enhanced Pearson eText*
The Enhanced Pearson eText provides a rich, interactive learning environment designed to improve student mastery of content. The Enhanced Pearson eText is:

Engaging. The new interactive, multimedia learning features were developed by the authors and other subject-matter experts to deepen and enrich the learning experience. Convenient. Enjoy instant online access from your computer or download the Pearson eText App to read on or offline on your iPad® and Android® tablet.* Affordable. Experience the advantages of the Enhanced Pearson eText along with all the benefits of print for 40% to 50% less than a print bound book.

* The Enhanced eText features are only available in the Pearson eText format. They are not available in third-party eTexts or downloads.

*The Pearson eText App is available on Google Play and in the App Store. It requires Android OS 3.1-4, a 7” or 10” tablet, or iPad iOS 5.0 or later.

This proposed book will be part of the new international series Educating the Young Child. It will focus on transitions that young children make to early care and education settings, along with the issues that surround this very important time in their lives. The theme is timely and important because children transitions are a universal rite of passage encountered by children worldwide. The diverse experiences, traits, and needs exhibited by young children provide early childhood educators with what may be a potentially challenging role. New experiences, such as the start of formal schooling, mark important and exciting events that also evoke different reactions from both parents and children.

With an international focus, the purpose of this book is to communicate an enlarged view of the currently constraining deficit-based American focus on readiness for the transition to formal school. By broadening this narrow view, the book will appreciate and honor the promise and potential of all children worldwide. The insights shared in this book have the potential to inform both practice and policy.

The book will provide a plethora of practices and strategies for promoting successful transitions for children in a variety of social and cultural contexts. As a resource for teacher education programs, along with in-service early childhood professionals, and university faculty, the book will also provide a theoretical and research background. This edited book will showcase the views of a variety of authors who have demonstrated experience in topics related to transitions in early childhood education. One of these noted authors is Nancy Balaban, who has published two significant works in this area.

As a former kindergarten teacher, I view the book as a resource that will assist educators to promote successful transitions for the students they serve. It has been my experience that student teachers who are placed in early childhood classrooms in the fall semester have an "edge" over those who student teach in the spring semester, due to the many practices that they observe as the transition process unfolds. For those who do not have the opportunity to prepare for teaching in this way, the book will help fill the gap between theory and practice and be a resource for teachers as they support their students’ transitions to new educational experiences.

To prepare an effectively organized book, a review of literature was conducted on the topic of transition to formal school. As the co-editor, I have also written on this subject and have researched international practices for promoting successful transitions. Authors who have previously published books and articles on this topic were researched and a tentative table of contents was developed based on previous work that was done in this area. The goal for the proposed book is to provide early childhood educators with a resource that is a compilation of research-based strategies and pertinent information that addresses issues related to the transition to formal school experiences, according to noted researchers who have already published in this area. Their expertise will be compiled into this book and address issues that include attachment and separation; meeting the needs of children with exceptionalities; children living in poverty; family relationships; and strategies for promoting successful transitions.

The targeted market for this book will benefit from the information contained in the book because of the universality of the transitions that children experience, yet the diverse needs that exist. When educators are familiar with current, research-based practices for addressing children’s transition needs, their students and their families will ultimately benefit. It is essential that early childhood educators are aware of the practices that exist that can help with this very important milestone in their students’ lives.

©2018 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.