Red Sun at War Part II

Explaining History

Book 7
Andrews UK Limited
Free sample

From the sinking of Repulse and the Prince of Wales to the fall of Malaya, Singapore, Borneo, Sumatra and Java and the bombing of Darwin, Japan's armies crashed through poorly defended and ill prepared colonies. With them came a degree of brutality towards prisoners and ethnic cleansing of Chinese civilians that made Japan's war synonimous with cruelty and prejudice. This ebook explores how the European powers made so many avoidable errors and how they were to learn from their mistakes.
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About the author

Nick Shepley is a writer, historian, teacher and tea drinker, currently writing a complete history of the 20th Century in 100 ebooks
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Additional Information

Publisher
Andrews UK Limited
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Published on
Dec 7, 2015
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Pages
39
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ISBN
9781781663028
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Asia / Japan
History / Military / World War II
History / United States / 20th Century
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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The classic samurai novel about the real exploits of the most famous swordsman.

Miyamoto Musashi was the child of an era when Japan was emerging from decades of civil strife. Lured to the great Battle of Sekigahara in 1600 by the hope of becoming a samurai--without really knowing what it meant--he regains consciousness after the battle to find himself lying defeated, dazed and wounded among thousands of the dead and dying. On his way home, he commits a rash act, becomes a fugitive and brings life in his own village to a standstill--until he is captured by a weaponless Zen monk.

The lovely Otsu, seeing in Musashi her ideal of manliness, frees him from his tortuous punishment, but he is recaptured and imprisoned. During three years of solitary confinement, he delves into the classics of Japan and China. When he is set free again, he rejects the position of samurai and for the next several years pursues his goal relentlessly, looking neither to left nor to right.

Ever so slowly it dawns on him that following the Way of the Sword is not simply a matter of finding a target for his brute strength. Continually striving to perfect his technique, which leads him to a unique style of fighting with two swords simultaneously, he travels far and wide, challenging fighters of many disciplines, taking nature to be his ultimate and severest teacher and undergoing the rigorous training of those who follow the Way. He is supremely successful in his encounters, but in the Art of War he perceives the way of peaceful and prosperous governance and disciplines himself to be a real human being.

He becomes a reluctant hero to a host of people whose lives he has touched and been touched by. And, inevitably, he has to pit his skill against the naked blade of his greatest rival.

Musashi is a novel in the best tradition of Japanese story telling. It is a living story, subtle and imaginative, teeming with memorable characters, many of them historical. Interweaving themes of unrequited love, misguided revenge, filial piety and absolute dedication to the Way of the Samurai, it depicts vividly a world Westerners know only vaguely. Full of gusto and humor, it has an epic quality and universal appeal.

The novel was made into a three-part movie by Director Hiroshi Inagai. For more information, visit the Shopping area
Exam Board: AQA
Level: AS/A-level
Subject: History
First Teaching: September 2015
First Exam: June 2016

AQA approved

Enhance and expand your students' knowledge and understanding of their AQA breadth study through expert narrative, progressive skills development and bespoke essays from leading historians on key debates.

- Builds students' understanding of the events and issues of the period with authoritative, well-researched narrative that covers the specification content

- Introduces the key concepts of change, continuity, cause and consequence, encouraging students to make comparisons across time as they advance through the course

- Improves students' skills in tackling interpretation questions and essay writing by providing clear guidance and practice activities

- Boosts students' interpretative skills and interest in history through extended reading opportunities consisting of specially commissioned essays from practising historians on relevant debates

- Cements understanding of the broad issues underpinning the period with overviews of the key questions, end-of-chapter summaries and diagrams that double up as handy revision aids

Democracy, Empire and War: Britain 1851-1964

This title explores political and social reform 1851-1914, the impact of both World Wars, the creation of the Welfare State and the transformational social changes of the 1950s and 1960s. It considers breadth issues of change, continuity, cause and consequence in this period through examining key questions on themes such as democracy, ideology, economy, society, Britain's' position in the world and the impact of key individuals.

Henry Green: Class, Style, and the Everyday offers a critical prism through which Green's fiction—from his earliest published short stories, as an Eton schoolboy, through to his last dialogic novels of the 1950s—can be seen as a coherent, subtle, and humorous critique of the tension between class, style, and realism in the first half of the twentieth century. The study extends on-going critical recognition that Green's work is central to the development of the novel from the twenties to the fifties, acting as a vital bridge between late modernist, inter-war, post-war, and postmodernist fiction. The overarching contention is that the shifting and destabilizing nature of Green's oeuvre sets up a predicament similar to that confronted by theorists of the everyday. Consequently, each chapter acknowledges the indeterminacy of the writing, whether it be: the non-singular functioning (or malfunctioning) of the name; the open-ended, purposefully ambiguous nature of its symbols; the shifting, cinematic nature of Green's prose style; the sensitive, but resolutely unsentimental depictions of the working-classes and the aristocracy in the inter-war period; the impact of war and its inconsistent irruptions into daily life; or the ways in which moments or events are rapidly subsumed back into the flux of the everyday, their impact left uncertain. Critics have, historically, offered up singular readings of Green's work, or focused on the poetic or recreative qualities of certain works, particularly those of the 1940s. Green's writing is, undoubtedly, poetic and extraordinary, but this book also pays attention to the clichéd, meta-textual, and uneventful aspects of his fiction.
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