Biomechanics of Active Movement and Deformation of Cells

Nato ASI Subseries H

Book 42
Springer Science & Business Media
Free sample

Cytomechanics is the application of the classical principles of mechanics in cell biology. It is an applied science concerned with the description and evaluation of mechanical properties of cells and their organelles as well as of the forces exerted by them. Thus, this topic needs a truly interdisciplinary approach, and accordingly this volume gives an up-to-date account of the current research done on cell division, mitosis, cytokinesis, cell locomotion and cell deformation during normal development and the cytoskeletal role in cell shape. Biologists, biomechanicians, biophysicists, biochemists and biomathematicians here discuss the basic concepts of mechanics and thermodynamics, emphasizing their applicability to cell activities.
Read more
Collapse
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Springer Science & Business Media
Read more
Collapse
Published on
Jun 29, 2013
Read more
Collapse
Pages
524
Read more
Collapse
ISBN
9783642836312
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Best For
Read more
Collapse
Language
English
Read more
Collapse
Genres
Science / Life Sciences / Biochemistry
Science / Life Sciences / Cell Biology
Science / Life Sciences / Microbiology
Science / Life Sciences / Molecular Biology
Technology & Engineering / Biomedical
Technology & Engineering / Engineering (General)
Read more
Collapse
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Collapse

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
The majority of scientists interested in fertilization and early developmental processes will undoubtably have encountered the works of Alberto Monroy at some time in their careers. Alberto's contribution to this field spans oogenesis to embryogenesis, where he used physiological, biochemical and morphological tools to answer a number of basic problems in cell biology. This multi-disciplinary approach, together with his remarkable intellectual flexibility and humour has had an enormous impact on this field and all those fortunate enough to have worked with him. The chapters in this book have been divided into four sections. The initial presentations revolve around late events of gameteogenesis, that lead to a physiologically mature gamete. Probably the most exciting area for research at the moment is the identification of the cytoplasmic mechanisms responsible for the meiotic arrest of oocytes and the factors responsible for initiating their maturation (Chapters 3 and 4). Less is known about the physiological changes in the male gamete in preparation for fertilization and this may be identified as a major area for future research. Although comparable data for the plant kingdom is presently restricted to studies on marine algae, new techniques for isolating angiosperm gametes (Chapters 1 and 17) promise rapid advances in this field. The second section looks at the events and molecules involved in gamete recognition, binding and fusion. One of the most controversial topics is when does sperm-egg fusion actually occur (Chapter 14).
The aim of electron probe microanalysis of biological systems is to identify, localize, and quantify elements, mass, and water in cells and tissues. The method is based on the idea that all electrons and photons emerging from an electron beam irradiated specimen contain information on its structure and composition. In particular, energy spectroscopy of X-rays and electrons after interaction of the electron beam with the specimen is used for this purpose. However, the application of this method in biology and medicine has to overcome three specific problems: 1. The principle constituent of most cell samples is water. Since liquid water is not compatible with vacuum conditions in the electron microscope, specimens have to be prepared without disturbing the other components, in parti cular diffusible ions (elements). 2. Electron probe microanaly sis provides physical data on either dry specimens or fully hydrated, frozen specimens. This data usually has to be con verted into quantitative data meaningful to the cell biologist or physiologist. 3. Cells and tissues are not static but dynamic systems. Thus, for example, microanalysis of physiolo gical processes requires sampling techniques which are adapted to address specific biological or medical questions. During recent years, remarkable progress has been made to overcome these problems. Cryopreparation, image analysis, and electron energy loss spectroscopy are key areas which have solved some problems and offer promise for future improvements.
This book is a collection of papers presented at a NATO Advanced Research Workshop on "Biology and Molecular Biology of Plant-Pathogen Interactions" which was held at Dillington College, Ilminster, UK, 1-6 September 1985. It had been preceded by Advanced Study Institutes at Porte Conte, Sardinia in 1975 and at Cape Sounion, Greece in 1981. In recent years, methods for the manipulation and transfer of genes have revolutionized our understanding of gene structure and function. It was thus opportune to bring together scientists from distinct disciplines, e. g. plant pathology, cytology, biochemistry and molecular biology to discuss our present understanding of cellular interactions between plants. We also explored how the potential offered by the newer molecular technologies could best be realized. It soon became evident at the Workshop, and is a repeated theme of this publication, that future research will need concentrated multi disciplinary programmes. Many of the new approaches will be valuable. For example, immunocytochemistry does, for the first time, allow molecules to be located precisely within infected tissues. Equally, the methods of DNA isolation and gene transformation will facilitate the isolation and characterization of genes associated with pathogenesis and specificity. The description at the Workshop of immunocytochemical protocols and of transformation systems for pathogenic fungi have already stimulated an upsurge in research on plant-pathogen relationships. The papers discuss many interactions between plants and fungal and bacterial pathogens, but also provide a comparison with mycorrhizal and symbiotic relationships, and those involving mycoparasites.
MUST WE AGE?
A long life in a healthy, vigorous, youthful body has always been one of humanity's greatest dreams. Recent progress in genetic manipulations and calorie-restricted diets in laboratory animals hold forth the promise that someday science will enable us to exert total control over our own biological aging.
Nearly all scientists who study the biology of aging agree that we will someday be able to substantially slow down the aging process, extending our productive, youthful lives. Dr. Aubrey de Grey is perhaps the most bullish of all such researchers. As has been reported in media outlets ranging from 60 Minutes to The New York Times, Dr. de Grey believes that the key biomedical technology required to eliminate aging-derived debilitation and death entirely—technology that would not only slow but periodically reverse age-related physiological decay, leaving us biologically young into an indefinite future—is now within reach.

In Ending Aging, Dr. de Grey and his research assistant Michael Rae describe the details of this biotechnology. They explain that the aging of the human body, just like the aging of man-made machines, results from an accumulation of various types of damage. As with man-made machines, this damage can periodically be repaired, leading to indefinite extension of the machine's fully functional lifetime, just as is routinely done with classic cars. We already know what types of damage accumulate in the human body, and we are moving rapidly toward the comprehensive development of technologies to remove that damage. By demystifying aging and its postponement for the nonspecialist reader, de Grey and Rae systematically dismantle the fatalist presumption that aging will forever defeat the efforts of medical science.

©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.