A Philosophy of Technology: From Technical Artefacts to Sociotechnical Systems

Morgan & Claypool Publishers
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In A Philosophy of Technology: From Technical Artefacts to Sociotechnical Systems, technology is analysed from a series of different perspectives. The analysis starts by focussing on the most tangible products of technology, called technical artefacts, and then builds step-wise towards considering those artefacts within their context of use, and ultimately as embedded in encompassing sociotechnical systems that also include humans as operators and social rules like legislation. Philosophical characterisations are given of technical artefacts, their context of use and of sociotechnical systems. Analyses are presented of how technical artefacts are designed in engineering and what types of technological knowledge is involved in engineering. And the issue is considered how engineers and others can or cannot influence the development of technology. These characterisations are complemented by ethical analyses of the moral status of technical artefacts and the possibilities and impossibilities for engineers to influence this status when designing artefacts and the sociotechnical systems in which artefacts are embedded. The running example in the book is aviation, where aeroplanes are examples of technical artefacts and the world aviation system is an example of a sociotechnical system. Issues related to the design of quiet aeroplane engines and the causes of aviation accidents are analysed for illustrating the moral status of designing, and the role of engineers therein. Table of Contents: Technical Artefacts / Technical Designing / Ethics and Designing / Technological Knowledge / Sociotechnical Systems / The Role of Social Factors in Technological Development / Ethics and Unintended Consequences of Technology
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Morgan & Claypool Publishers
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Published on
Dec 31, 2011
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Technology & Engineering / Electrical
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This book is concerned with two intimately related topics of metaphysics: the identity of entities and the foundations of classification. What it adds to previous discussions of these topics is that it addresses them with respect to human-made entities, that is, artefacts. As the chapters in the book show, questions of identity and classification require other treatments and lead to other answers for artefacts than for natural entities. These answers are of interest to philosophers not only for their clarification of artefacts as a category of things but also for the new light they may shed on these issue with respect to to natural entities.

This volume is structured in three parts. The contributions in Part I address basic ontological and metaphysical questions in relation to artefact kinds: How should we conceive of artefact kinds? Are they real kinds? How are identity conditions for artefacts and artefact kinds related? The contributions in Part II address meta-ontological questions: What, exactly, should an ontological account of artefact kinds provide us with? What scope can it aim for? Which ways of approaching the ontology of artefact kinds are there, how promising are they, and how should we assess this? In Part III, the essays offer engineering practice rather than theoretical philosophy as a point of reference. The issues addressed here include: How do engineers classify technical artefacts and on what grounds? What makes specific classes of technical artefacts candidates for ontologically real kinds, and by which criteria?​

Electrical Engineering 101 covers the basic theory and practice of electronics, starting by answering the question "What is electricity?" It goes on to explain the fundamental principles and components, relating them constantly to real-world examples. Sections on tools and troubleshooting give engineers deeper understanding and the know-how to create and maintain their own electronic design projects. Unlike other books that simply describe electronics and provide step-by-step build instructions, EE101 delves into how and why electricity and electronics work, giving the reader the tools to take their electronics education to the next level. It is written in a down-to-earth style and explains jargon, technical terms and schematics as they arise. The author builds a genuine understanding of the fundamentals and shows how they can be applied to a range of engineering problems.

This third edition includes more real-world examples and a glossary of formulae. It contains new coverage of:

MicrocontrollersFPGAsClasses of componentsMemory (RAM, ROM, etc.)Surface mountHigh speed designBoard layoutAdvanced digital electronics (e.g. processors)Transistor circuits and circuit designOp-amp and logic circuitsUse of test equipmentGives readers a simple explanation of complex concepts, in terms they can understand and relate to everyday life. Updated content throughout and new material on the latest technological advances.Provides readers with an invaluable set of tools and references that they can use in their everyday work.

This book presents comprehensive coverage of all the basic concepts in electrical engineering. It is designed for undergraduate students of almost all branches of engineering for an introductory course in essentials of electrical engineering.

This book explains in detail the properties of different electric circuit elements, such as resistors, inductors and capacitors. The fundamental concepts of dc circuit laws, such as Kirchhoff’s current and voltage laws, and various network theorems, such as Thevenin’s theorem, Norton’s theorem, superposition theorem, maximum power transfer theorem, reciprocity theorem and Millman’s theorem are thoroughly discussed. The book also presents the analysis of ac circuits, and discusses transient analysis due to switch operations in ac and dc circuits as well as analysis of three-phase circuits. It describes series and parallel RLC circuits, magnetic circuits, and the working principle of different kinds of transformers. In addition, the book explains the principle of energy conversion, the operating characteristics of dc machines, three-phase induction machines and synchronous machines as well as single-phase motors. Finally, the book includes a discussion on technologies of electric power generation along with the different types of energy sources.

Key Features :

Includes numerous solved examples and illustrations for sound conceptual understanding.

Provides well-graded chapter-end problems to develop the problem-solving capability of the students.

Supplemented with three appendices addressing matrix algebra, trigonometric identities and Laplace transforms of commonly used functions to help students understand the mathematical concepts required for the study of electrical engineering.

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