Autodrome: The Lost Race Circuits of Europe

Veloce Publishing Ltd
2
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Around Europe lie a number of long forgotten monuments, wind swept and abandoned the derelict buildings and crumbling tarmac are all that remains of once great motor racing circuits. From the great speed bowls of Monza and Brooklands, to the parkland of Crystal Palace. All photographed as they are now but remembered in their prime.
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About the author

 After dropping out of a degree in Automotive and Motorsport engineering, Londoner, S.S. Collins went on a mission to write a clear and easy-to-use guide to getting started in motorsport (How to Get started in Motorsport - Veloce). Currently Collins is working in the commercial section of  the voice of British Motorsport  that is the weekly newspaper Motorsport News. Collins is also a regular on entry lists as he competes in sprints, hillclimbs, races, rallies and trials. Collins lives in Beckenham, Kent.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Veloce Publishing Ltd
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Published on
Dec 31, 2005
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Pages
176
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ISBN
9781904788317
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Language
English
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Genres
Transportation / Automotive / History
Transportation / Automotive / Pictorial
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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 The Mini, the car of the 20th Century and still in motorsport in 1997, 35 years after its 1st event. This is it s story. In the 60 s the BMC works teams using Mini s were virtually unstoppable in their quest for recognition in the big world of rallying, they succeeded where others had failed and the BMC works teams were at the time probably the envy of the motorsport world. They introduced to the enthusiast the  Special Tuning  or  ST  as it was later known, a range of tuning products that the public could buy and fit to their own cars thus using the very same parts that the works team were using. Sadly the competition department was wound down and the ST finally went the same way in 1980. Imagine the excitement that hit the media when in the Autumn of 1993 Rover officially announced that they would fund the build of several cars to once again campaign the world famous Rallye Monte Carlo. Although they were not  works  cars, the large contribution of materials and money to the project it was regarded as tantamount to funding a works team, especially when Paddy Hopkirk was named as one of the drivers. It was this that started 4 years of  Works  backed mini s to varying degrees, culminating in 1996 to a full works backed team of 2 cars and a full campaign of rallies and races for the three years. Typically the Mini of the 90 s, similarly to the Mini of the 60 s, carried with it a fair degree of controversy. Over the next four years there was plenty of it, with money being diverted by the sponsor from one team to another, one car even being stolen and top rallying stars carrying out secret test sessions, being just a few examples. All of this using cars that were designed way back in the 50 s and even still using the same basic design of engine and gearbox against competitors who were using cars designed over thirty years later with modern engines and transmissions. This book highlights how the use of fuel injection, distributor-less ignition, six speed gearboxes and modern tyres all helped to bring the mighty mini once again to the foreground of modern rallying and racing. In 1996 the  ST  range of competition parts was re-introduced, with the parts coming from the latest 1996 build of  works  cars but once again in mid 1997 the project was pulled amid secrecy, sackings and bitter recriminations that even to this day have prevented the authors from being able to speak to those that were involved behind the scenes at the end of the line for the   Last Works Minis . With many unseen photo s of the cars development, copies of Rovers internal documents, copy pages from the road books of top rallies, all of this in colour this book truly brings this previously untold story to life.
 In the 1960s, model kit building was a huge hobby. Kids built plastic kits of planes, tanks, race cars, space ships, creatures from scary movies, you name it. Before baseball card collecting, Pokémon, and video games, model kit building was one of the most popular hobby activities. Car and airplane kits were the most popular, and among the car kits, muscle cars, as we know them today, were one of the most popular categories.

Many owners of real muscle cars today were not old enough to buy them when the cars were new, of course. Yet kids of the 1960s and 1970s worshiped these cars to an extent completely foreign to kids today. If you couldn’t afford or were too young to buy a muscle car back then, what could you do? For many, the next best thing was to buy, collect, and build muscle car kits from a variety of kit companies. Hundreds were made. Many of these kits have become collectible today, especially in original, unassembled form.

Although people still build kits today, there is a broad market for collectors of nostalgic model kits. People love the kits for the great box art, to rekindle fond memories of building them 40 years ago, or even as a companion to the full-scale cars they own today. Here, world-leading authority Tim Boyd takes you through the entire era of muscle car kits, covering the options, collectability, variety availability, and value of these wonderful kits today. Boyd also takes you through the differences between the original kits, the older reproduction kits, and the new reproduction kits that many people find at swap meets today. If you are looking to build a collection of muscle car kits, interested in getting the kits of your favorite manufacturer or even just of the cars you have owned, this book will be a valuable resource in your model kit search.

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