La Travesia de Enrique: La arriesgada odisea de un niño en busca de su madre

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Actualizada con un nuevo epílogo, reflexiones finales, fotos de Enrique y su familia, una entrevista con la autora y mucho más, esta es la versión definitiva de un clásico contemporáneo de los Estados Unidos.
 
Basada en la serie de Los Angeles Times ganadora de dos premios Pulitzer—al mejor reportaje de divulgación y a la mejor fotografía—esta asombrosa historia le pone rostro humano al actual debate sobre la reforma inmigratoria en los Estados Unidos. Devenido en clásico, este relato cautivante sobre la fuerza de la familia es un texto elegido en muchas escuelas y el punto de partida para una discusión trascendente sobre la inmigración en comunidades a lo largo y a lo ancho del país.
 
La travesía de Enrique es la inolvidable historia de un niño hondureño que se lanza en busca de su madre, once años después de que ella se vio forzada a dejar atrás a su familia hambrienta para buscar trabajo en los Estados Unidos. Enrique atraviesa parajes hostiles llenos de malhechores, forajidos y policías corruptos. Pero avanza a fuerza de ingenio, coraje, esperanza—y también gracias a la bondad de los desconocidos. Para Isabel Allende, La travesía de Enrique es “La Odisea del siglo XXI. Si va a leer solo un libro basado en hechos reales este año, tiene que ser este”.
 
“Magnífico . . . La Travesía de Enrique es una historia de amor, de familia, de hogares”.—The Washington Post Book World
 
“Un informe lacerante escrito desde las líneas de avanzada de la inmigración . . . angustioso y conmovedor”.—People (cuatro estrellas)
 
“Extraordinaria . . . aunque solo sea como historia de aventuras, vale la pena leer La travesía de Enrique . . . Con su impresionante trabajo periodístico, Nazario logra que el problema de la inmigración deje de ser una cuestión política para volverse una historia personal”.—Entertainment Weekly
 
“Cautivante y desgarradora . . . una historia que clamaba que alguien la contara”.—The Christian Science Monitor
 
“Una verdadera hazaña periodística. [Sonia Nazario] es increíblemente minuciosa e intrépida”.—Newsday


From the Trade Paperback edition.
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An astonishing story that puts a human face on the ongoing debate about immigration reform in the United States, now updated with a new Epilogue and Afterword, photos of Enrique and his family, an author interview, and more—the definitive edition of a classic of contemporary America
 
Based on the Los Angeles Times newspaper series that won two Pulitzer Prizes, one for feature writing and another for feature photography, this page-turner about the power of family is a popular text in classrooms and a touchstone for communities across the country to engage in meaningful discussions about this essential American subject.
  
Enrique’s Journey recounts the unforgettable quest of a Honduran boy looking for his mother, eleven years after she is forced to leave her starving family to find work in the United States. Braving unimaginable peril, often clinging to the sides and tops of freight trains, Enrique travels through hostile worlds full of thugs, bandits, and corrupt cops. But he pushes forward, relying on his wit, courage, hope, and the kindness of strangers. As Isabel Allende writes: “This is a twenty-first-century Odyssey. If you are going to read only one nonfiction book this year, it has to be this one.”
 
Look for special features inside. Join the Random House Reader’s Circle for author chats and more. 

“Magnificent . . . Enrique’s Journey is about love. It’s about family. It’s about home.”—The Washington Post Book World
 
“[A] searing report from the immigration frontlines . . . as harrowing as it is heartbreaking.”—People (four stars)
 
“Stunning . . . As an adventure narrative alone, Enrique’s Journey is a worthy read. . . . Nazario’s impressive piece of reporting [turns] the current immigration controversy from a political story into a personal one.”—Entertainment Weekly
 
“Gripping and harrowing . . . a story begging to be told.”—The Christian Science Monitor
 
“[A] prodigious feat of reporting . . . [Sonia Nazario is] amazingly thorough and intrepid.”—Newsday


From the Trade Paperback edition.
In this bestselling true story, one Honduran boy goes in search of his mother, who left to find work in the United States ten years ago—when he was just seven years old.
 
This is the true and heartbreaking story of sixteen-year-old Enrique, who sets off on a journey alone to find his mother, who he has not seen for eleven years, not since she left her starving family and illegally entered the United States, hoping to make enough money to send home to Honduras.
 
With little more in his pocket than a slip of paper bearing his mother’s phone number, Enrique embarks on a treacherous odyssey, traveling by clinging to the sides and tops of freight trains. Even when confronted by bandits, thugs, and corrupt cops, he is determined to complete his journey, often buoyed by the kindness of strangers or simply by luck finding water or food. In the face of this hostile world, Enrique’s love for his mother and his desire to be reunited with her endure and triumph.
 
Enrique’s journey tells the larger story of undocumented Latin American migrants in the United States. His is an inspiring and timeless tale about the meaning of family and fortitude that brings to light the daily struggles of migrants, legal and otherwise, and the complicated choices they face. The issues seamlessly interwoven into this gripping nonfiction work for young people, based on the adult phenomenon Enrique's Journey: The Story of a Boy's Dangerous Odyssey to Reunite with His Mother and the Pulitzer Price-winning Los Angeles Times newspaper series that inspired it, are perfect for common core usage and for discussions of current events.

Includes an 8-page photo insert, as well as an epilogue that describes what has happened to Enrique and his family since the adult edition was published.

Praise for Enrique’s Journey
 
“A heartwrenching account. Provides a human face, both beautiful and scarred, for the undocumented. A must read." —Kirkus Reviews, Starred
 
"This powerfully written survival story personalizes the complicated, pervasive, and heart-wrenching debates about immigration and immigrants' rights and will certainly spark discussion in the classroom and at home."—Booklist

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Additional Information

Publisher
Random House
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Published on
Feb 25, 2009
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Pages
416
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ISBN
9780307548245
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Cultural Heritage
History / Latin America / Central America
Social Science / Emigration & Immigration
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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