Molecular Communication

Cambridge University Press
Free sample

This comprehensive guide, by pioneers in the field, brings together, for the first time, everything a new researcher, graduate student or industry practitioner needs to get started in molecular communication. Written with accessibility in mind, it requires little background knowledge, and provides a detailed introduction to the relevant aspects of biology and information theory, as well as coverage of practical systems. The authors start by describing biological nanomachines, the basics of biological molecular communication and the microorganisms that use it. They then proceed to engineered molecular communication and the molecular communication paradigm, with mathematical models of various types of molecular communication and a description of the information and communication theory of molecular communication. Finally, the practical aspects of designing molecular communication systems are presented, including a review of the key applications. Ideal for engineers and biologists looking to get up to speed on the current practice in this growing field.
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About the author

Tadashi Nakano is an Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Japan. He has authored or co-authored a series of papers on molecular communication, including the very first paper, published in 2005.

Andrew W. Eckford is an Associate Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at York University, Toronto, Canada. He has authored over 50 papers in the peer-reviewed literature, and received the Association of Professional Engineers of Ontario Gold Medal.

Tokuko Haraguchi is an Executive Researcher in the Advanced ICT Research Institute at the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), Kobe, Japan, and a professor with the Graduate School of Science and the Graduate School of Frontier Biosciences at Osaka University, Japan. She has authored 100 papers in biological research.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Cambridge University Press
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Published on
Sep 12, 2013
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Pages
192
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ISBN
9781107292383
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Language
English
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Genres
Computers / Computer Science
Language Arts & Disciplines / Library & Information Science / General
Science / Life Sciences / Molecular Biology
Technology & Engineering / Biomedical
Technology & Engineering / Electronics / General
Technology & Engineering / Signals & Signal Processing
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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