twisdom: insights and revelations from @swamiroberts

Mindwarm Incorporated
3
Free sample

 Twitter wisdom can be hard to find.  

The 140 character limit of an utterance imposes a brevity that makes the tweeter get right to the point.  Living within this harsh constraint you'll find SwamiRoberts or @swamiroberts on Twitter.  The Swami began tweeting in 2010 when something became important enough to comment about.


While the Swami offers up opinions on many topics, most can be classified into the categories: Work, Wise, Love, Cash, Soul, Joke, Tech, Twitter and Food.  These are the chapters of the book with insights onto each.


Language is a fascination of the Swami.  Recently the phrase "throwing sheep" came to mean offering up a pointless or senseless comment.  The Swami strives to avoid throwing sheep, but on occasion will refrain from seriousness.  Often there is a serious side to the Swami and a truth inside the funny comment.  The Love and Soul chapters are more serious than the other sections, although fans of Dilbert or Office Space will find the truths in the Work chapter familiar.


The world around us is the inspiration for the Swami.  Here in Portland, Oregon food carts have exploded all over town.  I just don't recall seeing very many before 2009, but now they are everywhere.  One such food cart sold mini (small) sandwiches.  Eating one such sandwich inspired the Swami tweet:  "When you are very hungry eat a mini-sandwich and you will only be hungry."


2012 was the year that the ancient Mayans predicted as the end of the world, or at least some kind of apocalypse happening.  In the chapter Wise there are eleven apocalypse survival tips the Swami gives you.  My favorite is tip number one: "Do not warn others about the coming apocalypse."


In the past it was only the court jester that could speak the truth safely to the king.  Of course even the jester had to be cautious and was careful to conceal his insight with humor.  Take the Swami in the same vein.  There be truth in these tweets.


twisdom has an entire chapter on Twitter and while it's not exactly a course in manners, there are dos and don'ts -- not just for Twitter, but also for Facebook, LinkedIn, FourSquare, Google+ and any other social network.  The Swami also has some thoughts on the differences between these social networks.


There are a few quotes in this book.  Paul Bingman was a close personal friend who died in 2011.  I really wish he was here to read this book, although he did read the Swami's tweets and had fun feedback.  Paul's quote is "All you really have is your time and your attention."  That was the philosophy of at least his later years, where Paul always strove to help others and do the good he could while also having some fun.


You might take the Swami in small doses.  You might gorge your eyes and mind with a long good read.  I find myself reading the Swami when I'm feeling lost or down and the Swami always picks me up a bit.  Here's hoping the Swami lifts you to a higher self too.

Read more

About the author

Swami Roberts is the alter-ego of John R. Roberts, a long-time technologist and aspiring writer.  In 2009 during a period of unemployment Roberts discovered Twitter, the perfect combination of technology and concise writing.  The attraction was instant if the inspiration was not.  What then to tweet?  There are plenty of Twitterers who post every mundane aspect of their life, but what about someone reflecting on the higher meaning of life and the paradoxes we encounter every day.

This was the inspiration for writing something that someone else might want for read, even if only in 140 characters or less.  Kind of a new form of graffiti, more transient, more ordered, but that same quality of random human expression.  Yet with those constraints can something profound or funny or profoundly funny emerge?  That is the idea of Swami Roberts.

On August 23, 2010 the first psychic tweet of @swamiroberts emanated out into the ether.  The Swami has been emanating ever since.

Read more
4.7
3 total
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Mindwarm Incorporated
Read more
Published on
Oct 4, 2013
Read more
Pages
197
Read more
ISBN
9780991049905
Read more
Language
English
Read more
Genres
Humor / General
Read more
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
Read more

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
 If you read technology news, you’ll notice it’s not just a story of amazing new product introductions, or even that plus copycat product introductions.  All the usual aspects of business are there: fierce competition, new contenders, old survivors, great ideas but business failures, mediocre ideas that somehow seem to succeed and prosper.

As a reporter, commentator and blogger on mobile technology, I’ve collected what happened in the industry in 2015 and make predictions on what will and won’t happen in 2016.

You can read what did happen in the mobile technology in 2015.  Often I deliver a comment with the news item and usually there is a link to the web page of the original announcement.  This way you can dive into any detail level you desire, read my news feed for the overview or follow the related web link to the longer article.

History is moving so fast now that it is all recorded electronically, but I’m surprised no one else has collected it and presented it for consideration.  Here is 2015 from the mobile technology industry for your consideration along with my own observations and opinions about where things are headed.

It’s often overlooked that the technology industry is an industry.  By that I mean its main concerns are profit and growth.  As consumers we love the new products and unique abilities we are gaining from technology, but it is a business akin to any other, trying to seduce us to pry money out of our wallets.  So I cover the horse race aspect of the business, who’s up, who’s down.  Is that changing?  Is that likely to change?

The longer implications of what the technology industry is doing are vast and social.  We are moving to an always on, always connected society where we can communicate with someone instantly and find an answer to any question quickly.  The entire database of human knowledge is now available in the palm of your hand whenever you desire it.  Everything is there, the good, the bad, right and wrong, hate and love, music and noise.  We are obsessed with technology, not in and of itself, but as a means to an end.  Technology is the means to satisfy our curiosity or even our desire for self-expression.  We are taking photos machine gun-style with our smartphones and choose the few to share.  As humans we are gathering ever more data about ourselves and sharing more about ourselves than we probably thought possible.

Bill Gates was once asked why the computer industry had generated so much improvement in its products over a relatively few years.  He gave some boring answer about Moore’s Law, but the real answer is that computers are in their teenage years.  They are growing and growing.  They will not always do so.  So too the technology industry is in a state of rapid change.  I see the shift to smaller devices as a new paradigm, smashing some businesses and growing others into giants.  Their stories are here in the news.

In short here are predictions for what won’t and will happen in 2016 for the mobile technology industry, breakdowns of marketshare figures on the horse race aspect of the business, chapters on Apple, Samsung, Google, Microsoft, Nokia, Blackberry, Amazon, Yahoo, news about social media giants Facebook, Twitter, Google+, LinkedIn, Foursquare, SnapChat and the carriers themselves Verizon, AT&T, Sprint andT-Mobile.  You can also review my 2015 mobile predictions and see my track record on predictions.

Finally there are some essays on how all this mobile tech is figuring into our lives.

I’ve divided the news into the subjects it covers, but also put in the appendix all the news as it came out in chronological ordering.  You can read the firehose of events in the appendix, or just read about one topic at a time in the earlier chapters.

New York Times bestselling author, superstar comedian, and Hollywood box office star Kevin Hart turns his immense talent to the written word by writing some words. Some of those words include: the, a, for, above, and even even. Put them together and you have a “hilarious but also heartfelt” (Elle) memoir on survival, success, and the importance of believing in yourself.

The question you’re probably asking yourself right now is: What does Kevin Hart have that a book also has?

According to the three people who have seen Kevin Hart and a book in the same room, the answer is clear:

A book is compact. Kevin Hart is compact.

A book has a spine that holds it together. Kevin Hart has a spine that holds him together.

A book has a beginning. Kevin Hart’s life uniquely qualifies him to write this book by also having a beginning.

It begins in North Philadelphia. He was born an accident, unwanted by his parents. His father was a drug addict who was in and out of jail. His brother was a crack dealer and petty thief. And his mother was overwhelmingly strict, beating him with belts, frying pans, and his own toys.

The odds, in short, were stacked against our young hero. But Kevin Hart, like Ernest Hemingway, J.K. Rowling, and Chocolate Droppa before him, was able to defy the odds and turn it around. In his literary debut, he takes us on a journey through what his life was, what it is today, and how he’s overcome each challenge to become the man he is today.

And that man happens to be the biggest comedian in the world, with tours that sell out football stadiums and films that have collectively grossed over $3.5 billion.

He achieved this not just through hard work, determination, and talent. “Hart is an incredibly magnetic storyteller, on the page as he is onstage, and that’s what shines through [in this] genial, entertaining guide to a life in comedy” (Kirkus Reviews).
If you read technology news, you’ll notice it’s not just a story of amazing new product introductions, or even that plus copycat product introductions.  All the usual aspects of business are there: fierce competition, new contenders, old survivors, great ideas but business failures, mediocre ideas that somehow seem to succeed and prosper.

As a reporter, commentator and blogger on mobile technology, I’ve collected what happened in the industry in 2013 and make predictions on what will and won’t happen in 2014.


You can read what did happen in the mobile technology in 2013.  Often I deliver a comment with the news item and usually there is a link to the web page of the original announcement.  This way you can dive into any detail level you desire, read my news feed for the overview or follow the related web link to the longer article.


History is moving so fast now that it is all recorded electronically, but I’m surprised no one else has collected it and presented it for consideration.  Here is 2013 from the mobile technology industry for your consideration along with my own observations and opinions about where things are headed.


It’s often overlooked that the technology industry is an industry.  By that I mean its main concerns are profit and growth.  As consumers we love the new products and unique abilities we are gaining from technology, but it is a business akin to any other, trying to seduce us to pry money out of our wallets.  So I cover the horse race aspect of the business, who’s up, who’s down.  Is that changing?  Is that likely to change?


The longer implications of what the technology industry is doing are vast and social.  We are moving to an always on, always connected society where we can communicate with someone instantly and find an answer to any question quickly.  The entire database of human knowledge is now available in the palm of your hand whenever you desire it.  Everything is there, the good, the bad, right and wrong, hate and love, music and noise.  We are obsessed with technology, not in and of itself, but as a means to an end.  Technology is the means to satisfy our curiosity or even our desire for self-expression.  We are taking photos machine gun-style with our smartphones and choose the few to share.  As humans we are gathering ever more data about ourselves and sharing more about ourselves than we probably thought possible.


Bill Gates was once asked why the computer industry had generated so much improvement in its products over a relatively few years.  He gave some boring answer about Moore’s Law, but the real answer is that computers are in their teenage years.  They are growing and growing.  They will not always do so.  So too the technology industry is in a state of rapid change.  I see the shift to smaller devices as a new paradigm, smashing some businesses and growing others into giants.  Their stories are here in the news.


In short here are predictions for what won’t and will happen in 2014 for the mobile technology industry, breakdowns of marketshare figures on the horse race aspect of the business, chapters on Apple, Samsung, Google, Microsoft, Nokia, Blackberry, Amazon, Yahoo, news about social media giants Facebook, Twitter, Google+, LinkedIn, Foursquare, SnapChat and the carriers themselves Verizon, AT&T, Sprint andT-Mobile.  You can also review my 2013 mobile predictions and see my track record on predictions.


Finally there are some essays on how all this mobile tech is figuring into our lives.


I’ve divided the news into the subjects it covers, but also put in the appendix all the news as it came out in chronological ordering.  You can read the firehose of events in the appendix, or just read about one topic at a time in the earlier chapters.




Table of Contents



Preface


Introduction


Chapter 1: 2014 Predictions


Chapter 2: Mobile Marketshare


Chapter 3: Apple


Chapter 4: Samsung


Chapter 5: Google


Chapter 6: Microsoft


Chapter 7: Nokia


Chapter 8: Blackberry


Chapter 9: Amazon


Chapter 10: Social Media


Chapter 11: Yahoo


Chapter 12: Carriers


Chapter 13: 2013 Predictions


Chapter 14: Essays


Appendix

In Furiously Happy, #1 New York Times bestselling author Jenny Lawson explores her lifelong battle with mental illness. A hysterical, ridiculous book about crippling depression and anxiety? That sounds like a terrible idea.

But terrible ideas are what Jenny does best.

As Jenny says:

"Some people might think that being 'furiously happy' is just an excuse to be stupid and irresponsible and invite a herd of kangaroos over to your house without telling your husband first because you suspect he would say no since he's never particularly liked kangaroos. And that would be ridiculous because no one would invite a herd of kangaroos into their house. Two is the limit. I speak from personal experience. My husband says that none is the new limit. I say he should have been clearer about that before I rented all those kangaroos.


"Most of my favorite people are dangerously fucked-up but you'd never guess because we've learned to bare it so honestly that it becomes the new normal. Like John Hughes wrote in The Breakfast Club, 'We're all pretty bizarre. Some of us are just better at hiding it.' Except go back and cross out the word 'hiding.'"

Furiously Happy is about "taking those moments when things are fine and making them amazing, because those moments are what make us who we are, and they're the same moments we take into battle with us when our brains declare war on our very existence. It's the difference between "surviving life" and "living life". It's the difference between "taking a shower" and "teaching your monkey butler how to shampoo your hair." It's the difference between being "sane" and being "furiously happy."

Lawson is beloved around the world for her inimitable humor and honesty, and in Furiously Happy, she is at her snort-inducing funniest. This is a book about embracing everything that makes us who we are - the beautiful and the flawed - and then using it to find joy in fantastic and outrageous ways. Because as Jenny's mom says, "Maybe 'crazy' isn't so bad after all." Sometimes crazy is just right.

If you read technology news, you’ll notice it’s not just a story of amazing new product introductions, or even that plus copycat product introductions.  All the usual aspects of business are there: fierce competition, new contenders, old survivors, great ideas but business failures, mediocre ideas that somehow seem to succeed and prosper.

As a reporter, commentator and blogger on mobile technology, I’ve collected what happened in the industry in 2014 and make predictions on what will and won’t happen in 2015.

You can read what did happen in the mobile technology in 2014.  Often I deliver a comment with the news item and usually there is a link to the web page of the original announcement.  This way you can dive into any detail level you desire, read my news feed for the overview or follow the related web link to the longer article.

History is moving so fast now that it is all recorded electronically, but I’m surprised no one else has collected it and presented it for consideration.  Here is 2013 from the mobile technology industry for your consideration along with my own observations and opinions about where things are headed.

It’s often overlooked that the technology industry is an industry.  By that I mean its main concerns are profit and growth.  As consumers we love the new products and unique abilities we are gaining from technology, but it is a business akin to any other, trying to seduce us to pry money out of our wallets.  So I cover the horse race aspect of the business, who’s up, who’s down.  Is that changing?  Is that likely to change?

The longer implications of what the technology industry is doing are vast and social.  We are moving to an always on, always connected society where we can communicate with someone instantly and find an answer to any question quickly.  The entire database of human knowledge is now available in the palm of your hand whenever you desire it.  Everything is there, the good, the bad, right and wrong, hate and love, music and noise.  We are obsessed with technology, not in and of itself, but as a means to an end.  Technology is the means to satisfy our curiosity or even our desire for self-expression.  We are taking photos machine gun-style with our smartphones and choose the few to share.  As humans we are gathering ever more data about ourselves and sharing more about ourselves than we probably thought possible.

Bill Gates was once asked why the computer industry had generated so much improvement in its products over a relatively few years.  He gave some boring answer about Moore’s Law, but the real answer is that computers are in their teenage years.  They are growing and growing.  They will not always do so.  So too the technology industry is in a state of rapid change.  I see the shift to smaller devices as a new paradigm, smashing some businesses and growing others into giants.  Their stories are here in the news.

In short here are predictions for what won’t and will happen in 2015 for the mobile technology industry, breakdowns of marketshare figures on the horse race aspect of the business, chapters on Apple, Samsung, Google, Microsoft, Nokia, Blackberry, Amazon, Yahoo, news about social media giants Facebook, Twitter, Google+, LinkedIn, Foursquare, SnapChat and the carriers themselves Verizon, AT&T, Sprint andT-Mobile.  You can also review my 2014 mobile predictions and see my track record on predictions.

Finally there are some essays on how all this mobile tech is figuring into our lives.

I’ve divided the news into the subjects it covers, but also put in the appendix all the news as it came out in chronological ordering.  You can read the firehose of events in the appendix, or just read about one topic at a time in the earlier chapters.

If you read technology news, you’ll notice it’s not just a story of amazing new product introductions, or even that plus copycat product introductions.  All the usual aspects of business are there: fierce competition, new contenders, old survivors, great ideas but business failures, mediocre ideas that somehow seem to succeed and prosper.

As a reporter, commentator and blogger on mobile technology, I’ve collected what happened in the industry in 2013 and make predictions on what will and won’t happen in 2014.


You can read what did happen in the mobile technology in 2013.  Often I deliver a comment with the news item and usually there is a link to the web page of the original announcement.  This way you can dive into any detail level you desire, read my news feed for the overview or follow the related web link to the longer article.


History is moving so fast now that it is all recorded electronically, but I’m surprised no one else has collected it and presented it for consideration.  Here is 2013 from the mobile technology industry for your consideration along with my own observations and opinions about where things are headed.


It’s often overlooked that the technology industry is an industry.  By that I mean its main concerns are profit and growth.  As consumers we love the new products and unique abilities we are gaining from technology, but it is a business akin to any other, trying to seduce us to pry money out of our wallets.  So I cover the horse race aspect of the business, who’s up, who’s down.  Is that changing?  Is that likely to change?


The longer implications of what the technology industry is doing are vast and social.  We are moving to an always on, always connected society where we can communicate with someone instantly and find an answer to any question quickly.  The entire database of human knowledge is now available in the palm of your hand whenever you desire it.  Everything is there, the good, the bad, right and wrong, hate and love, music and noise.  We are obsessed with technology, not in and of itself, but as a means to an end.  Technology is the means to satisfy our curiosity or even our desire for self-expression.  We are taking photos machine gun-style with our smartphones and choose the few to share.  As humans we are gathering ever more data about ourselves and sharing more about ourselves than we probably thought possible.


Bill Gates was once asked why the computer industry had generated so much improvement in its products over a relatively few years.  He gave some boring answer about Moore’s Law, but the real answer is that computers are in their teenage years.  They are growing and growing.  They will not always do so.  So too the technology industry is in a state of rapid change.  I see the shift to smaller devices as a new paradigm, smashing some businesses and growing others into giants.  Their stories are here in the news.


In short here are predictions for what won’t and will happen in 2014 for the mobile technology industry, breakdowns of marketshare figures on the horse race aspect of the business, chapters on Apple, Samsung, Google, Microsoft, Nokia, Blackberry, Amazon, Yahoo, news about social media giants Facebook, Twitter, Google+, LinkedIn, Foursquare, SnapChat and the carriers themselves Verizon, AT&T, Sprint andT-Mobile.  You can also review my 2013 mobile predictions and see my track record on predictions.


Finally there are some essays on how all this mobile tech is figuring into our lives.


I’ve divided the news into the subjects it covers, but also put in the appendix all the news as it came out in chronological ordering.  You can read the firehose of events in the appendix, or just read about one topic at a time in the earlier chapters.




Table of Contents



Preface


Introduction


Chapter 1: 2014 Predictions


Chapter 2: Mobile Marketshare


Chapter 3: Apple


Chapter 4: Samsung


Chapter 5: Google


Chapter 6: Microsoft


Chapter 7: Nokia


Chapter 8: Blackberry


Chapter 9: Amazon


Chapter 10: Social Media


Chapter 11: Yahoo


Chapter 12: Carriers


Chapter 13: 2013 Predictions


Chapter 14: Essays


Appendix

If you read technology news, you’ll notice it’s not just a story of amazing new product introductions, or even that plus copycat product introductions.  All the usual aspects of business are there: fierce competition, new contenders, old survivors, great ideas but business failures, mediocre ideas that somehow seem to succeed and prosper.

As a reporter, commentator and blogger on mobile technology, I’ve collected what happened in the industry in 2014 and make predictions on what will and won’t happen in 2015.

You can read what did happen in the mobile technology in 2014.  Often I deliver a comment with the news item and usually there is a link to the web page of the original announcement.  This way you can dive into any detail level you desire, read my news feed for the overview or follow the related web link to the longer article.

History is moving so fast now that it is all recorded electronically, but I’m surprised no one else has collected it and presented it for consideration.  Here is 2013 from the mobile technology industry for your consideration along with my own observations and opinions about where things are headed.

It’s often overlooked that the technology industry is an industry.  By that I mean its main concerns are profit and growth.  As consumers we love the new products and unique abilities we are gaining from technology, but it is a business akin to any other, trying to seduce us to pry money out of our wallets.  So I cover the horse race aspect of the business, who’s up, who’s down.  Is that changing?  Is that likely to change?

The longer implications of what the technology industry is doing are vast and social.  We are moving to an always on, always connected society where we can communicate with someone instantly and find an answer to any question quickly.  The entire database of human knowledge is now available in the palm of your hand whenever you desire it.  Everything is there, the good, the bad, right and wrong, hate and love, music and noise.  We are obsessed with technology, not in and of itself, but as a means to an end.  Technology is the means to satisfy our curiosity or even our desire for self-expression.  We are taking photos machine gun-style with our smartphones and choose the few to share.  As humans we are gathering ever more data about ourselves and sharing more about ourselves than we probably thought possible.

Bill Gates was once asked why the computer industry had generated so much improvement in its products over a relatively few years.  He gave some boring answer about Moore’s Law, but the real answer is that computers are in their teenage years.  They are growing and growing.  They will not always do so.  So too the technology industry is in a state of rapid change.  I see the shift to smaller devices as a new paradigm, smashing some businesses and growing others into giants.  Their stories are here in the news.

In short here are predictions for what won’t and will happen in 2015 for the mobile technology industry, breakdowns of marketshare figures on the horse race aspect of the business, chapters on Apple, Samsung, Google, Microsoft, Nokia, Blackberry, Amazon, Yahoo, news about social media giants Facebook, Twitter, Google+, LinkedIn, Foursquare, SnapChat and the carriers themselves Verizon, AT&T, Sprint andT-Mobile.  You can also review my 2014 mobile predictions and see my track record on predictions.

Finally there are some essays on how all this mobile tech is figuring into our lives.

I’ve divided the news into the subjects it covers, but also put in the appendix all the news as it came out in chronological ordering.  You can read the firehose of events in the appendix, or just read about one topic at a time in the earlier chapters.

 If you read technology news, you’ll notice it’s not just a story of amazing new product introductions, or even that plus copycat product introductions.  All the usual aspects of business are there: fierce competition, new contenders, old survivors, great ideas but business failures, mediocre ideas that somehow seem to succeed and prosper.

As a reporter, commentator and blogger on mobile technology, I’ve collected what happened in the industry in 2015 and make predictions on what will and won’t happen in 2016.

You can read what did happen in the mobile technology in 2015.  Often I deliver a comment with the news item and usually there is a link to the web page of the original announcement.  This way you can dive into any detail level you desire, read my news feed for the overview or follow the related web link to the longer article.

History is moving so fast now that it is all recorded electronically, but I’m surprised no one else has collected it and presented it for consideration.  Here is 2015 from the mobile technology industry for your consideration along with my own observations and opinions about where things are headed.

It’s often overlooked that the technology industry is an industry.  By that I mean its main concerns are profit and growth.  As consumers we love the new products and unique abilities we are gaining from technology, but it is a business akin to any other, trying to seduce us to pry money out of our wallets.  So I cover the horse race aspect of the business, who’s up, who’s down.  Is that changing?  Is that likely to change?

The longer implications of what the technology industry is doing are vast and social.  We are moving to an always on, always connected society where we can communicate with someone instantly and find an answer to any question quickly.  The entire database of human knowledge is now available in the palm of your hand whenever you desire it.  Everything is there, the good, the bad, right and wrong, hate and love, music and noise.  We are obsessed with technology, not in and of itself, but as a means to an end.  Technology is the means to satisfy our curiosity or even our desire for self-expression.  We are taking photos machine gun-style with our smartphones and choose the few to share.  As humans we are gathering ever more data about ourselves and sharing more about ourselves than we probably thought possible.

Bill Gates was once asked why the computer industry had generated so much improvement in its products over a relatively few years.  He gave some boring answer about Moore’s Law, but the real answer is that computers are in their teenage years.  They are growing and growing.  They will not always do so.  So too the technology industry is in a state of rapid change.  I see the shift to smaller devices as a new paradigm, smashing some businesses and growing others into giants.  Their stories are here in the news.

In short here are predictions for what won’t and will happen in 2016 for the mobile technology industry, breakdowns of marketshare figures on the horse race aspect of the business, chapters on Apple, Samsung, Google, Microsoft, Nokia, Blackberry, Amazon, Yahoo, news about social media giants Facebook, Twitter, Google+, LinkedIn, Foursquare, SnapChat and the carriers themselves Verizon, AT&T, Sprint andT-Mobile.  You can also review my 2015 mobile predictions and see my track record on predictions.

Finally there are some essays on how all this mobile tech is figuring into our lives.

I’ve divided the news into the subjects it covers, but also put in the appendix all the news as it came out in chronological ordering.  You can read the firehose of events in the appendix, or just read about one topic at a time in the earlier chapters.

©2018 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.