#EdJourney: A Roadmap to the Future of Education

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Your formula for managing innovation and transforminglearning

#EdJourney: A Roadmap to the Future of Education is arefreshing change from the negativity so common in the world ofeducation today. Over the course of a 3-month solo road trip acrossthe United States, author Grant Lichtman discovered that there ismuch to be positive about in today's K-12 schools. Lichtman, one ofthe country's leading experts in educational innovation,interviewed over 600 teachers, administrators, students, parents,and trustees to find out what kind of innovations they're doingright—and how others can leverage their successes.

Innovation in education takes hard work, planning, andcooperation. With examples from around the country and findingsfrom the latest education research, #EdJourney maps out howadministrators and teachers can embrace the innovation process thatschools and learners need now. Today's 21st century educationpresents unique challenges and opportunities to students, and thisis a trailblazing practical guide to making sure education is readyfor the future. #EdJourney focuses on four keyquestions:

  • What new learning strategies are the top schools implementingto prepare our students for their future rather than for ourpast?
  • How do teachers and administrators manage transitions to newtypes of teaching and learning?
  • What are the key obstacles to shifting away from the assemblyline model of education?
  • How can we all leverage the lessons of success from the mostinnovative schools?

The concrete examples and advice in this book will help youbring innovation and educational design concepts into your school.#EdJourney goes beyond the theoretical need forchange—by now a familiar topic to almost everyone—andtakes a real-world approach to achieving transformative educationin any school.

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About the author

GRANT LICHTMAN is a globally recognized thought leader in the drive to transform K-12 education. Grant shares resources, articles, connections with other schools and innovative programs, and his blog, "The Future of K-12 Education," at www.grantlichtman.com. He is also the author of Moving the Rock and The Falconer.

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Additional Information

Publisher
John Wiley & Sons
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Published on
Aug 13, 2014
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Pages
304
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ISBN
9781118898871
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Language
English
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Genres
Education / Educational Policy & Reform / General
Education / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Advance Praise for Moving the Rock

“The future comes at us fast — which means school reformers don’t have time to wait. They need real tools in real time. That’s why Moving the Rock is so important. Grant Lichtman has guidance for anyone — teachers, parents, administrators, government officials — intent on helping young people succeed not ‘someday,’ but today.”

— Daniel H. Pink, best-selling author of Drive and A Whole New Mind

“Grant Lichtman’s book is a clear and comprehensive guide to the “what" and the “how” of educational transformation. Organized around essential levers for change, it is a must-read for anyone who wants to make a difference in our schools.”

—Tony Wagner, Harvard Ilab Expert in Residence, and best-selling author of The Global Achievement Gap and Creating Innovators”

“This book gives me hope for a brighter future in education. Despite the dark clouds imposed by misguided policies, Grant Lichtman diligently tells stories of grass-roots innovations in the classrooms and schools all over the world. Moving the Rock is an inspiring call to action for all educators.”
—Yong Zhao, Ph.D., Foundation Distinguished Professor, School of Education, University of Kansas

“If you have children, or teach children, or want our children to succeed, this is a must-read book. Grant Lichtman throws down the challenge for all of us; that WE can change education, and he shows us just how successful schools everywhere are overcoming change-killing inertia in our schools.”

—Todd Rose, best-selling author of The End of Average; Harvard University

Moving the Rock: Seven Levers WE Can Press to Transform Educationgives educators, parents, administrators, students, and other stakeholders a clear paradigm for transforming our outmoded schools into schools that will help our children to meet the challenges of tomorrow.

It’s no secret that our educational system is stuck. Moving the Rock shows the important roles all of us can play in un-sticking it by moving seven specific levers that will change the focus of education from what we teach to how we learn. Importantly, moving the levers is completely possible today, and in fact is already happening now in many schools.

Drawing on research and extensive experience in the education community, Grant Lichtman outlines the seven essential levers that can profoundly change our schools so that we are teaching all our children how to learn, including

• Creating the Demand for Better Schools

• Building School-Community Learning Laboratories

• Encouraging Open Access to Knowledge

• Fixing How We Measure Student Success

• Teaching the Teachers what They Really Need to Know

• and more

At the end of each of each chapter there are one or more challenges, ways that all of us can collectively turn the pioneering work of others into transformation for all our schools.

“Drop the flashcards—grit, character, and curiosity matter even more than cognitive skills. A persuasive wake-up call.”—People

Why do some children succeed while others fail? The story we usually tell about childhood and success is the one about intelligence: success comes to those who score highest on tests, from preschool admissions to SATs. But in How Children Succeed, Paul Tough argues that the qualities that matter more have to do with character: skills like perseverance, curiosity, optimism, and self-control.

How Children Succeed introduces us to a new generation of researchers and educators, who, for the first time, are using the tools of science to peel back the mysteries of character. Through their stories—and the stories of the children they are trying to help—Tough reveals how this new knowledge can transform young people’s lives. He uncovers the surprising ways in which parents do—and do not—prepare their children for adulthood. And he provides us with new insights into how to improve the lives of children growing up in poverty. This provocative and profoundly hopeful book will not only inspire and engage readers, it will also change our understanding of childhood itself.

“Illuminates the extremes of American childhood: for rich kids, a safety net drawn so tight it’s a harness; for poor kids, almost nothing to break their fall.”—New York Times

“I learned so much reading this book and I came away full of hope about how we can make life better for all kinds of kids.”—Slate
A significant contribution to our search for true 21st Century education. -Bo Adams, Principal, Westminster Schools We would all trade a lot of knowledge for a little bit of wisdom. -Aaron Butler, Falconer Class of 1998 School prepares us to be successful. We aspire to be happy. -Robert Landis, Falconer Class of 2001 If we want to achieve elegant results we have to teach the tools of elegant thinking. We want our young people to develop the traits of our heroes: courage, compassion, creativity, leadership, invention, vision. We need our students and employees to learn the skills that will give them a competitive advantage in an interdependent world. Yet our schools and training centers are stuck in a 19th century model that ignores this fundamental goal. Geared toward the teacher and student in all of us, The Falconer provides a simple model for making the leap from passive learner of previous knowledge to an active creator of new ideas. Based on a five-year classroom trial, and now used by forward-looking educators to help build a 21st Century educational model, The Falconer adapts a novel interpretation of the classic book of strategy, The Art of War, to new goals of educational creativity and personal fulfillment. Grant Lichtman is the Chief Operating Officer of Francis Parker School in San Diego, California. He earned a bachelors and masters degree from Stanford University and has founded and managed companies involved in education, energy, and the geosciences. Lichtman, his wife Julie, and two children live in Poway, California.
A passionate plea to preserve and renew public education, The Death and Life of the Great American School System is a radical change of heart from one of America's best-known education experts.
Diane Ravitch-former assistant secretary of education and a leader in the drive to create a national curriculum-examines her career in education reform and repudiates positions that she once staunchly advocated. Drawing on over forty years of research and experience, Ravitch critiques today's most popular ideas for restructuring schools, including privatization, standardized testing, punitive accountability, and the feckless multiplication of charter schools. She shows conclusively why the business model is not an appropriate way to improve schools. Using examples from major cities like New York, Philadelphia, Chicago, Denver, and San Diego, Ravitch makes the case that public education today is in peril.

Ravitch includes clear prescriptions for improving America's schools:
leave decisions about schools to educators, not politicians or businessmendevise a truly national curriculum that sets out what children in every grade should be learningexpect charter schools to educate the kids who need help the most, not to compete with public schoolspay teachers a fair wage for their work, not "merit pay" based on deeply flawed and unreliable test scoresencourage family involvement in education from an early age
The Death and Life of the Great American School System is more than just an analysis of the state of play of the American education system. It is a must-read for any stakeholder in the future of American schooling.
How do other countries create “smarter” kids? What is it like to be a child in the world’s new education superpowers? The Smartest Kids in the World “gets well beneath the glossy surfaces of these foreign cultures and manages to make our own culture look newly strange....The question is whether the startling perspective provided by this masterly book can also generate the will to make changes” (The New York Times Book Review).

In a handful of nations, virtually all children are learning to make complex arguments and solve problems they’ve never seen before. They are learning to think, in other words, and to thrive in the modern economy. Inspired to find answers for our own children, author and Time magazine journalist Amanda Ripley follows three Americans embed­ded in these countries for one year. Kim, fifteen, raises $10,000 so she can move from Oklahoma to Finland; Eric, eighteen, trades his high-achieving Minnesota suburb for a booming city in South Korea; and Tom, seventeen, leaves a historic Pennsylvania village for Poland.

Through these young informants, Ripley meets battle-scarred reformers, sleep-deprived zombie students, and a teacher who earns $4 million a year. Their stories, along with groundbreaking research into learning in other cultures, reveal a pattern of startling transformation: none of these countries had many “smart” kids a few decades ago. Things had changed. Teaching had become more rigorous; parents had focused on things that mattered; and children had bought into the promise of education.
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