Future Science Fiction Digest Issue 0

Free sample

Inaugural issue of a new science fiction magazine with an added focus on international fiction and translation.

Ranging from lyrical to humorous, from optimistic to jaded, from earthbound to interstellar, these stories offer six very different glimpses into the future.

Matthew Kressel's "The History Within Us" takes place during the final stages of the heat death of the universe, where a ship filled with refugees of different species is huddled near one of the last burning stars, and that star is about to go nova.

Tatiana Ivanova's satirical "Impress Me, Then We'll Talk About the Money" imagines the consequences of unscrupulous pharmacologists creating drugs that allow people to fulfill their deepest desire, which is to change.

In "Earthrise," Lavie Tidhar examines what it means to be an artist in a futuristic society where humanity has colonized the solar system.

In Alvaro Zinos-Amaro's "e^h" human colonists encounter a region of space in which their junk DNA mutates, revealing information encoded there by aliens.

Teng Ye's "Universal Cigarettes" is a tongue-in-cheek tale of a grandiose marketing stunt with a dark twist reminiscent of Philip K. Dick's work.

In the Nebula Award-nominated "Utopia, LOL?" by Jamie Wahls, a modern-day human wakes from cryogenic suspension in a utopian future overseen by a benevolent computer.
Read more
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
UFO Publishing
Read more
Published on
May 13, 2018
Read more
Pages
128
Read more
Language
English
Read more
Genres
Fiction / Science Fiction / Genetic Engineering
Fiction / Science Fiction / Space Exploration
Read more
Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
Read more
Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
Read more
Eligible for Family Library

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
 Fantasy Scroll Magazine is an online, quarterly publication featuring science fiction, fantasy, horror, and paranormal short-fiction. The magazine’s mission is to publish high-quality, entertaining, and thought-provoking speculative fiction. With a mixture of short stories, flash fiction, and micro-fiction, Fantasy Scroll Magazine aims to appeal to a wide audience. 


Issue #3 includes 13 short stories: 

"Descant" — Piers Anthony 

"The Peacemaker" — Rachel A. Brune 

"My Favorite Photos of Anne" — Aaron Polson 

"Verisimilitude" — Alan Murdock 

"Orc Legal" — James Beamon 

"Kindle My Heart" — Rebecca Birch 

"Burn in Me" — Carrie Martin 

"The Memory-Setter's Apprentice" — Alvaro Zinos-Amaro 

"Hither and Yon" — Anatoly Belilovsky 

"The Contents of the Box with the Ribbon" — David Neilsen 

"The First First Fire" — Alexander Monteagudo 

"Missing Tessa" — Anna Yeatts 

"The Perfect Book" — Alex Shvartsman 


In the non-fiction section, this issue features: 

-Interview With Author Piers Anthony 

-Interview With Author and Publisher Anna Yeatts 

-Interview With Editor Scott H. Andrews 

-Artist Spotlight: Suebsin Pulsiri 

-Book Review: Upgraded (edited by Neil Clarke) 

-Movie Review: The House That Dripped Blood (1971) (Peter Duffell) 


The magazine is open to most sub-genres of science fiction, including hard SF, military, apocalyptic & post-apocalyptic, space opera, time travel, cyberpunk, steampunk, and humorous. Similarly for fantasy, we accept most sub-genres, including alternate world, dark fantasy, heroic, high or epic, historical, medieval, mythic, sword & sorcery, urban fantasy, and humorous. The magazine also publishes horror and paranormal short fiction. 

Unidentified Funny Objects is the first volume in the ongoing series of anthologies collecting humorous science fiction and fantasy stories. Packed with laughs, it has 29 stories ranging from lighthearted whimsy to the wild and zany.

Inside you will find a zombear, tweeting aliens, down-on-their-luck vampires, time twisting belly dancers, moon Nazis, stoned computers, omnivorous sex-maniac pandas, and a spell-casting Albert Einstein.

WARNING: Some stories contain R-rated content and are inappropriate for minors, nuns, and anyone who lacks a sense of humor.

Includes the following stories:

“El and Al vs. Himmler’s Horrendous Horde from Hell” by Mike Resnick
“The Alchemist’s Children” by Nathaniel Lee
“Moon Landing” by Lavie Tidhar
“Fight Finale from the Near Future” by James Beamon
“Love Thy Neighbors” by Ken Liu
“The Alien Invasion As Seen In The Twitter Stream of @dweebless” by Jake Kerr
“Dreaming Harry” by Stephanie Burgis
“The Last Dragon Slayer” by Chuck Rothman
“The Real Thing” by Don Sakers
“2001 Revisited via 1969″ by Bruce Golden
“The Working Stiff” by Matt Mikalatos
“Temporal Shimmies” by Jennifer Pelland
“One-Hand Tantra” by Ferrett Steinmetz
“Of Mat and Math” by Anatoly Belilovsky
“Timber!” by Scott Almes
“Go Karts of the Gods” by Michael Kurland
“No Silver Lining” by Zach Shephard
“If You Act Now” by Sergey Lukyanenko
“My Kingdom for a Horse” by Stephen D. Rogers
“First Date” by Jamie Lackey
“All I Want for Christmas” by Siobhan Gallagher
“Venus of Willendorf” by Deborah Walker
“An Unchanted Sword” by Jeff Stehman
“The Day They Repossessed my Zombies” by K.G. Jewell
“The Fifty One Suitors of Princess Jamatpie” by Leah Cypess
“The Secret Life of Sleeping Beauty” by Charity Tahmaseb
“The Velveteen Golem” by David Sklar
“The Worm’s Eye View” by Jody Lynn Nye
“Cake from Mars” by Marko Kloos
An NPR Best Book of 2016
An Amazon Featured Best Science Fiction & Fantasy Book
A Guardian Best SF & Fantasy Book of 2016
Longlist, British Science Fiction Award 2016, Best Novel
2017 Arthur C. Clarke Award nominee


"It's all of science fiction distilled into a single book."
—Warren Ellis, author of Transmetropolitan and Gun Machine

A worldwide diaspora has left a quarter of a million people at the foot of a space station. Cultures collide in real life and virtual reality. The city is literally a weed, its growth left unchecked. Life is cheap, and data is cheaper.

When Boris Chong returns to Tel Aviv from Mars, much has changed. Boris’s ex-lover is raising a strangely familiar child who can tap into the datastream of a mind with the touch of a finger. His cousin is infatuated with a robotnik—a damaged cyborg soldier who might as well be begging for parts. His father is terminally-ill with a multigenerational mind-plague. And a hunted data-vampire has followed Boris to where she is forbidden to return.

Rising above them is Central Station, the interplanetary hub between all things: the constantly shifting Tel Aviv; a powerful virtual arena, and the space colonies where humanity has gone to escape the ravages of poverty and war. Everything is connected by the Others, powerful alien entities who, through the Conversation—a shifting, flowing stream of consciousness—are just the beginning of irrevocable change.

At Central Station, humans and machines continue to adapt, thrive...and even evolve.
©2018 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.