Fundamentals of Waste and Environmental Engineering

The Energy and Resources Institute (TERI)
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The book Fundamentals of Waste and Environmental Engineering discusses the design and operation of engineering hardware and facilities for pollution control. It covers fundamentals of mesophillc and thermophilic bioprocessing of wastes. The book highlights the ways to control and minimize unwanted pollution and includes research-generated information and data. It also provides outcome of a national training programme on biotechnology treatments of biowastes, jointly conducted by DBEB, IIT Delhi, and CPCB, MEF, Government of India. Theoretical, multichoice and practice tutorial numerical are also included in the book.
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About the author

Dr S. N. Mukhopadhyay is Professor (Retd), School of Biotechnology, Gautam Buddha University, Greater Noida (Uttar Pradesh) and former Adjunct Professor at the Department of Biological Sciences, Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani. He has also served Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Delhi as Professor in the Department of Biochemical Engineering and Biotechnology (DBEB). He is one of the founder faculty members of Biochemical Engineering Research Centre (BERC) and DBEB. He was Head of BERC during 1985–90.

 

He has been a Visiting Expert Scientist at LANFI, Mexico, and SFIT, Zurich, Switzerland; and Visiting Professor at CIEA del. IPN, Mexico. He is a recipient of JSPS Fellowship at Osaka University, Japan; and Fulbright Fellow, at UCHC, USA. Dr S. N. Mukhopadhyay was an Overseas Associate (Government of India) at Caltech, Chemical Engineering Department, USA; and FNAE, India. He was also an invited Visiting Scientist at Tomas Bata University, Zlin, Czech Republic. He is an Honorary Member to International Division of Research Board of Advisors, ABI, USA, and was elected Life Fellow of Indian Institute of Chemical Engineers. He was also selected and nominated for International Engineer of the year 2008 by IBC, Cambridge, England. He has authored six books and holds more than 135 publications to his name.

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Additional Information

Publisher
The Energy and Resources Institute (TERI)
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Published on
May 30, 2019
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Pages
320
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ISBN
9789386530103
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Nature / Natural Resources
Technology & Engineering / Chemical & Biochemical
Technology & Engineering / Environmental / Waste Management
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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How can garbage turn into gold? What does recycling have to do with globalization? Where does all that stuff we throw away go, anyway?

When you drop your Diet Coke can or yesterday's newspaper in the recycling bin, where does it go? Probably halfway around the world, to people and places that clean up what you don't want and turn it into something you can't wait to buy. In Junkyard Planet, Adam Minter-veteran journalist and son of an American junkyard owner-travels deeply into a vast, often hidden, 500-billion-dollar industry that's transforming our economy and environment.

Minter takes us from back-alley Chinese computer recycling operations to recycling factories capable of processing a jumbo jet's worth of trash every day. Along the way, we meet an international cast of characters who have figured out how to squeeze Silicon Valley-scale fortunes from what we all throw away. Junkyard Planet reveals how “going green” usually means making money-and why that's often the most sustainable choice, even when the recycling methods aren't pretty.

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A Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist takes readers on a surprising tour of the world of garbage.

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