Productivity in the U.S. Services Sector: New Sources of Economic Growth

Brookings Institution Press
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The services industries—which include jobs ranging from flipping hamburgers to providing investment advice—can no longer be characterized, as they have in the past, as a stagnant sector marked by low productivity growth. They have emerged as one of the most dynamic and innovative segments of the U.S. economy, now accounting for more than three-quarters of gross domestic product. During the 1990s, 19 million additional jobs were created in this sector, while growth was stagnant in the goods-producing sector. Here, Jack Triplett and Barry Bosworth analyze services sector productivity, demonstrating that fundamental changes have taken place in this sector of the U.S. economy. They show that growth in the services industries fueled the post-1995 expansion in the U.S. productivity and assess the role of information technology in transforming and accelerating services productivity. In addition to their findings for the services sector as a whole, they include separate chapters for a diverse range of industries within the sector, including transportation and communications, wholesale and retail trade, and finance and insurance. The authors also examine productivity measurement issues, chiefly statistical methods for measuring services industry output. They highlight the importance of making improvements within the U.S. statistical system to provide the more accurate and relevant measures essential for analyzing productivity and economic growth.
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About the author

Jack E. Triplett , is a visiting fellow in Economic Studies at the Brookings Institution. He served previously as a chief economist at the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis. He is the editor of Measuring the Prices of Medical Treatments (Brookings, 1999). Barry P. Bosworth is a senior fellow and Robert V. Roosa Chair in International Economics at the Brookings Institution.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Brookings Institution Press
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Published on
Sep 21, 2004
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Pages
401
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ISBN
9780815796633
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Industries / Service
Business & Economics / Labor
Political Science / Public Policy / Economic Policy
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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