My Grandma’s Vintage Recipes: Old Standards for a New Age

Falbe Publishing
2
Free sample

Regain the wisdom and creativity of our ancestors who were experts at whipping up something special with tight budgets and limited supplies. You may not be able to find the “10-cent bag of marshmallows” anymore, but modern cooks can still benefit from this collection of 1920s vintage recipes collected by my late Grandmother. In 2012 I discovered her handwritten recipe notebook from 1926 and developed this cookbook.

While updating the directions for modern cooks, I maintained the vintage charm of her original notes. Generations ago people did not have a bunch of fancy ingredients, but they still came up with a variety of yummy quick breads, cakes, desserts, pies, salads, main dishes, canning recipes, and fruitcakes. This cookbook has a special emphasis on fruitcakes. I share my mood-altering experiences with her fruitcake recipes. Bakers who love the holidays should definitely add a classic Christmas fruitcake to their list. All jokes aside, fruitcake deserves a place among elite holiday desserts.

And people into urban farming and homesteading can harvest delicious value from these vintage recipes meant to use up all the dried fruit and nuts you can pick. Plus find a variety of classic uses for all the tomatoes, cucumbers, and apples you can grow with marvelous canning recipes for sauces, pickles, and chutneys.

My Grandma’s name was Edna Oldershaw Irwin and her recipes reflect the character of the food in 1920s Canada where she grew up in Chatham, Ontario. After months of effort, I’ve prepared 64 of her recipes for publication. I no longer have my Grandma, but I still have her cookbook and now you can read it too.   

Enjoy trying out these vintages recipes in a cookbook inspired by Canadian heritage. Most of them are very simple and surprisingly tasty. 

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About the author

Falbe worked for six months to flesh out and fine tune the directions from the original notebook. She also added proper processing times for the canning recipes based on up-to-date cooking recommendations. But she still retained some of the vintage charm from her grandmother. For example, there are directions for chipping chocolate because in the 1920s chocolate chips were apparently not available. 

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Additional Information

Publisher
Falbe Publishing
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Published on
Jun 21, 2013
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Pages
100
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ISBN
9781492257448
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Language
English
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Genres
Cooking / Courses & Dishes / Cakes
Cooking / Courses & Dishes / Desserts
Cooking / General
Cooking / History
Cooking / Holiday
Cooking / Methods / Baking
Cooking / Methods / Canning & Preserving
Cooking / Methods / Low Budget
Cooking / Regional & Ethnic / Canadian
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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 As our six children moved out I would often receive a phone call asking, “Mom, how did you make this?  What was the secret ingredient?” 

As a child I would watch my Mother cook and preserve fruit, can and freeze vegetables, bake, and have family get together’s to make Perogys.  I enjoyed cooking when I first took it in Junior High School and started to collect recipes. I did a lot of family history and over the years I also was given many recipes from the family members plus saved many from other resources.  My Stepfather taught me the cooking of wild game to make it tender.

When I got married we had our own garden plus raised cattle, chickens, turkeys, pigs, rabbits and even tried ostriches.  We did our own butchering and I learned from my husband’s boss how to do make headcheese from the pigs.  I made cottage cheese and butter from our milk cow.  I made sourdough from scratch also.  From our garden we froze a lot of the crop for the winter.  The fruit we grew got made into jams and jellies as well as the wild fruit that we picked.  Often we would go picking berries as a family outing or while Roy and I were haying the children would pick wild berries near the fields.  We would have a treat of fruit at the end of the day and the excess got made into preserves or into juice.

My one challenge was making bread even with a bread machine.  It never turned out.  Roy took over that challenge and got a recipe figured out that even now I cannot fail making bread.   The Grandchildren loved helping him make buns.   When Roy passed away I tried the recipe and when the Grandchildren tried the bread their remark was “It taste’s just like Grandpa’s bread.”

My recipes were in several boxes and I knew where the ones were that I used the most.  When I started entering my collection into a computer Roy suggested I should make a cookbook because I had a collection of over a century of recipes.  I have done that now and the collection has recipes from early 1900’s with the old way of the size of the ingredients like “amount of butter the size of an egg” up to modern amounts.  I also have enclosed tips that were given to me over the years plus a few old poems that have a special meaning to me.

Preserve the bounty of your garden, support local growers, claim total control over ingredients, increase your food security, and enjoy great tasting foods that beat the pants off of anything from a factory. All of this is possible with home canning, and you are absolutely capable of mastering this easy-to-learn and affordable food preservation method. 

Once the commonplace domestic art of most households, home canning faded for a while but is again attracting a new generation of enthusiasts. This short guide quickly presents everything you need to know to safely preserve delicious foods like jams, fruits, relishes, pickles, soups, and most importantly tomatoes. Nothing at the store tastes as good as homemade tomato sauce preserved from tomatoes the day they were picked at the perfect peak of ripeness. Stop wondering if you could can food in your home kitchen and start doing it. This guide is written from the direct experience of the author who uses both the boiling water bath and pressure canning methods to preserve a variety of foods.

This guide specifically addresses how to use a boiling water bath and a pressure canner. You will also learn how to easily decide which one you should use for any specific food. The principles of safety and how to prevent food spoilage are explained. A selection of recipes for popular foods is also included with a detailed emphasis on ways to preserve tomatoes and applesauce. Advice on ways to find affordable fresh local produce is also offered. If you are interested in affordably improving the quality of the food you eat, supporting local food, and expanding the productivity of your home garden, then you definitely need to learn home canning.

The highly anticipated complement to the New York Times bestselling Momofuku cookbook, Momofuku Milk Bar reveals the recipes for the innovative, addictive cookies, pies, cakes, ice creams, and more from the wildly popular Milk Bar bakery.

Momofuku Milk Bar shares the recipes for Christina Tosi’s fantastic desserts—the now-legendary riffs on childhood flavors and down-home classics (all essentially derived from ten mother recipes)—along with the compelling narrative of the unlikely beginnings of this quirky bakery’s success. It all started one day when Momofuku founder David Chang asked Christina to make a dessert for dinner that night. Just like that, the pastry program at Momofuku began.

Christina’s playful desserts, including the compost cookie, a chunky chocolate-chip cookie studded with crunchy salty pretzels and coffee grounds; the crack pie, a sugary-buttery confection as craveable as the name implies; the cereal milk ice cream, made from everyone’s favorite part of a nutritious breakfast—the milk at the bottom of a bowl of cereal; and the easy layer cakes that forgo fancy frosting in favor of unfinished edges that hint at the yumminess inside helped the restaurants earn praise from the New York Times and the Michelin Guide and led to the opening of Milk Bar, which now draws fans from around the country and the world.

With all the recipes for the bakery’s most beloved desserts—along with ones for savory baked goods that take a page from Chang’s Asian-flavored cuisine, such as Kimchi Croissants with Blue Cheese—and 100 color photographs, Momofuku Milk Bar makes baking irresistible off-beat treats at home both foolproof and fun.
Filled with righteous rage, Dacian and Onja defend their newly liberated home from tabre attack. No longer hobbled by dreams of rys and tabre unity, Dacian crafts enchanted weapons and trains the rys to fight. Onja’s love fills his emptiness, and together they reach toward even greater magical powers.

As the rys and tabre clash, Onja’s faithful warrior Amar faces many challenges while raising an army for her. Can he dominate the Overlord of the Kez? Will Amar expose himself to the carnal charms of the Shamaness Loxane to gain a new ally? Can he give up his lust for Princess Demeda and ransom her to the Temulanka Tribe as his duty demands?

While he sows war across the tribal kingdoms, Onja also enthralls the savages of the Nufalese frontier and unleashes their brutal hordes upon vulnerable settlements. Desperate to defend his people, Cruce Chenomet and his comrades trade wenching and drinking for grueling battles. His passionate dalliance from the year before unexpectedly becomes a vexing relationship. Bombarded by threats both to his body and heart, Cruce quickly loses hope but keeps his courage as he confronts the savage storm.

Enjoy a wild ride across two magical realms in this epic fantasy on Google Play that takes no prisoners.   

Falbe's skill as a writer of fantasy series shines in this stunning sequel to the first Rys Rising book. She masterfully weaves multiple story lines across civilizations. Fans get caught up in her characters. Readers have compared her fiction to that of A Game of Thrones author George R.R. Martin. People who've become addicted to her series count her among their favorite authors, including Peter V. Brett, Brandon Sanderson, Robin Hobb, and Terry Goodkind.

Second part of an English language fantasy series available to ebook readers worldwide at Google Play.

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