The Regional Impact of National Policies: The Case of Brazil

Edward Elgar Publishing
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Brazil is a country of continental proportions whose gross domestic product is unevenly distributed among its various regions. The impact of general domestic economic policies has often been perceived as not being regionally neutral, but as reinforcing th
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About the author

WERNER BAER is Professor of Economics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign./e Previously he taught at Harvard, Yale, and Vanderbilt, and he has been a visiting professor at the University of Sao Paulo, Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, and the Instituto Tocuato De Tella in Buenos Aires. He specializes in the study of Latin American economies, including the process of industrialization, its positive and negative impact, the region's inflationary experiences, the role of the state, and the process of privatization.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Edward Elgar Publishing
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Published on
May 1, 2012
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Pages
264
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ISBN
9780857936707
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Development / Business Development
Business & Economics / Development / Economic Development
Business & Economics / Development / General
Business & Economics / Government & Business
Business & Economics / Structural Adjustment
Political Science / Public Policy / Economic Policy
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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Examine the costs and benefits of fiscal “wars” between Brazilian states

Latin American Business examines Brazil’s use of fiscal incentives to attract investors to help remedy disparities in the country’s regional distribution of income. Since the 1990s, individual Brazilian states have taken the initiative in trying to lure domestic and foreign firms to locate within their borders, targeting the automotive industry, textiles, and shoe production. But their efforts have led to mixed results and questions about whether these fiscal wars have been legitimate attempts at regional economic development or simply a distortion in the allocation of resources. This insightful collection of case studies and essays sheds considerable light on the issue.

For several generations, the notion has been debated both in advanced industrial countries and in developing countries that regional differences in income will gradually be eliminated as poor regions (where money is scare but labor is not) benefit from the inflow of investments. In reality, this has rarely happened; Latin American Business examines why that has been the case in Brazil. The book’s contributors fuel this continuing debate, analyzing topics that include Bahia’s efforts to attract a Ford plant, the Mercedes-Benz project in Juiz de Fora, the case of Renault in Paraná, fiscal incentive programs in Pernambuco, and the tax incentive policies of Ceará.

Latin American Business includes:
an evaluation of the costs and benefits of federal and state incentives given to Ford Motor Company to attract a plant in Bahia
an analysis of the use of state and municipal incentives by the state of Minas Gerais in dealing with Mercedes-Benz Corporation
a look at Paraná’s agreement with Renault and the degree to which it has created jobs and attracted other investments
an examination of structural changes in the Brazilian automotive industry
a look at the Brazilian automotive industry in the 1990s
an evaluation of the results of Pernambo’s fiscal incentives program from 1996 to 2003
a discussion of the economic logic for tax incentives
a look at the economic effects of regional tax incentives
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Examine the changing nature of foreign investments in Latin America!Generously enhanced with easy-to-understand charts, tables, and graphs, this book covers the ins and outs of foreign direct investment in the established and emerging markets of Latin America. In addition to an overview of direct investment for the entire Latin American region in the 1990s, this valuable book examines specific countries’ experiences with FDI in that decade. These include Argentina, Chile, Mexico, Brazil, Peru, Ecuador, Paraguay, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua.Spending on environmental projects is on the rise, and Latin American nations are at the forefront of this financial whirlwind in the developing world. Foreign Direct Investment in Latin America: Its Changing Nature at the Turn of the Century examines the difficulties of assessing environmental investments. It analyzes the role of international capital in Latin-American environmental issues and discusses the major players, such as the World Bank, in international capital and the environment.Foreign Direct Investment in Latin America presents case studies that illustrate: the history of FDI in Argentina and the impact of the privatization of state-owned enterprises in 1991-1993 the similarities and differences between 1990s FDI in Mexico and Chile the ways that modern investment in Brazil differs in purpose from investment there in previous economic eras how Peru addressed its balance-of-payments crisis in a time when its domestic financial markets were thin and there existed few sources of financing besides banks how Paraguay’s historical lack of infrastructure has hampered FDI efforts there Ecuador’s financial and balance-of-payments crisis-its currency is in free-fall and its financial institutions are on the brink of collapse . . . and much more!Foreign Direct Investment in Latin America packs all this valuable information into a single user-friendly source. As we move into the new millennium, no student, educator, or investor interested in this quickly evolving, volatile market should be without it!
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