The Internet Ideology: From A as in Advertising to Z as in Zipcar

Massimo Moruzzi

Regardless of the question, the Internet is the answer. 

We are told that the Internet is the solution to every kind of problem. But is it true? Will Big Data help us to understand the world? Is the Internet really on the side of democracy? Does it make sense to make gamify everything? Is the Internet (still) the Frontier? Or is that era past us and we are now faced with the greatest concentration of economic power of all time?

It seemed perfectly normal to Jeff Jarvis, a famous American journalist, to ask: "What Would Google Do?" if the company based in Mountain View were put in charge of the public sector.

It apparently didn't occur to him that the rules and goals the public sector lives by are, or at least should be, different from those of a private company.

According to many, the Internet, this jumble of servers and communication protocols, is the greatest invention ever. But is it really so? And wasn't the same thing said of inventions such as the telegraph, the radio, movie pictures, television or nuclear energy?

Today the Internet is winning. To the point that it seems natural that it should win. But is it so? Does the Internet have to win? Is the Internet's impact positive for society?

Perhaps it's time to clear our minds and talk about the Ideology of the Internet.

- - -

We will speak about...

- Advertising

- Apps

- Big Data

- Cloud

- Disruption

- Gamification

- Hippies

- Internet of Things

- Jefferson (Thomas, non George)

- Long Tail

- LSD

- Manifest Destiny

- Moore's Law

...and much much more!

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About the author

I have worked or consulted for a number of start-ups from more countries than I can probably remember: Germany (Ciao); France (Meetic); Italy (Ennunci); Sweden (Twingly); Italy/Ireland (Zzub); Denmark (Atosho); Spain (Ducksboard); Italy/UK (VoiceMap); and Canada (Transit App). I started a blog at dotcoma.it well before it was fashionable to do so, and later wrote a book on the web, advertising and social media: What Happened To Advertising? What Would Gossage Do?

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Additional Information

Publisher
Massimo Moruzzi
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Published on
Mar 31, 2019
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Pages
74
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Free Enterprise & Capitalism
Computers / Information Theory
Computers / Security / General
Language Arts & Disciplines / Library & Information Science / General
Political Science / Political Process / Media & Internet
Political Science / Privacy & Surveillance
Social Science / Privacy & Surveillance
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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Eligible for Family Library

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Longlisted for the National Book Award
New York Times Bestseller

A former Wall Street quant sounds an alarm on the mathematical models that pervade modern life — and threaten to rip apart our social fabric

We live in the age of the algorithm. Increasingly, the decisions that affect our lives—where we go to school, whether we get a car loan, how much we pay for health insurance—are being made not by humans, but by mathematical models. In theory, this should lead to greater fairness: Everyone is judged according to the same rules, and bias is eliminated.

But as Cathy O’Neil reveals in this urgent and necessary book, the opposite is true. The models being used today are opaque, unregulated, and uncontestable, even when they’re wrong. Most troubling, they reinforce discrimination: If a poor student can’t get a loan because a lending model deems him too risky (by virtue of his zip code), he’s then cut off from the kind of education that could pull him out of poverty, and a vicious spiral ensues. Models are propping up the lucky and punishing the downtrodden, creating a “toxic cocktail for democracy.” Welcome to the dark side of Big Data.

Tracing the arc of a person’s life, O’Neil exposes the black box models that shape our future, both as individuals and as a society. These “weapons of math destruction” score teachers and students, sort résumés, grant (or deny) loans, evaluate workers, target voters, set parole, and monitor our health.

O’Neil calls on modelers to take more responsibility for their algorithms and on policy makers to regulate their use. But in the end, it’s up to us to become more savvy about the models that govern our lives. This important book empowers us to ask the tough questions, uncover the truth, and demand change.

— Longlist for National Book Award (Non-Fiction)
— Goodreads, semi-finalist for the 2016 Goodreads Choice Awards (Science and Technology)
— Kirkus, Best Books of 2016
— New York Times, 100 Notable Books of 2016 (Non-Fiction)
— The Guardian, Best Books of 2016
— WBUR's "On Point," Best Books of 2016: Staff Picks
— Boston Globe, Best Books of 2016, Non-Fiction
The New York Times Bestseller

In May 2013, Glenn Greenwald set out for Hong Kong to meet an anonymous source who claimed to have astonishing evidence of pervasive government spying and insisted on communicating only through heavily encrypted channels. That source turned out to be the 29-year-old NSA contractor and whistleblower Edward Snowden, and his revelations about the agency's widespread, systemic overreach proved to be some of the most explosive and consequential news in recent history, triggering a fierce debate over national security and information privacy. As the arguments rage on and the government considers various proposals for reform, it is clear that we have yet to see the full impact of Snowden's disclosures.

Now for the first time, Greenwald fits all the pieces together, recounting his high-intensity ten-day trip to Hong Kong, examining the broader implications of the surveillance detailed in his reporting for The Guardian, and revealing fresh information on the NSA's unprecedented abuse of power with never-before-seen documents entrusted to him by Snowden himself.
Going beyond NSA specifics, Greenwald also takes on the establishment media, excoriating their habitual avoidance of adversarial reporting on the government and their failure to serve the interests of the people. Finally, he asks what it means both for individuals and for a nation's political health when a government pries so invasively into the private lives of its citizens—and considers what safeguards and forms of oversight are necessary to protect democracy in the digital age. Coming at a landmark moment in American history, No Place to Hide is a fearless, incisive, and essential contribution to our understanding of the U.S. surveillance state.

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